Category Archives: literary news

Juan Felipe Herrera Named U.S. Poet Laureate

juan-felipe-herrera-named-u-s-poet-laureate

Juan Felipe Herrera on Youtube

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=juan+felipe+herrera

Announcement from The Library of Congress

 News from the Library of Congress

June 10, 2015

Librarian of Congress Appoints Juan Felipe Herrera Poet Laureate

Librarian of Congress James H. Billington today announced the appointment of Juan Felipe Herrera as the Library’s 21st Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, for 2015-2016. Herrera will take up his duties in the fall, participating in the Library of Congress National Book Festival on Saturday, September 5 and opening the Library’s annual literary season with a reading of his work at the Coolidge Auditorium on Tuesday, September 15.

“I see in Herrera’s poems the work of an American original—work that takes the sublimity and largesse of “Leaves of Grass” and expands upon it,” Billington said. “His poems engage in a serious sense of play—in language and in image—that I feel gives them enduring power. I see how they champion voices, traditions and histories, as well as a cultural perspective, which is a vital part of our larger American identity.”

Herrera, who succeeds Charles Wright as Poet Laureate, is the first Hispanic poet to serve in the position. He said, “This is a mega-honor for me, for my family and my parents who came up north before and after the Mexican Revolution of 1910—the honor is bigger than me. I want to take everything I have in me, weave it, merge it with the beauty that is in the Library of Congress, all the resources, the guidance of the staff and departments, and launch it with the heart-shaped dreams of the people. It is a miracle of many of us coming together.”

Herrera joins a long line of distinguished poets who have served in the position, including Natasha Trethewey, Philip Levine, W. S. Merwin, Kay Ryan, Charles Simic, Donald Hall, Ted Kooser, Louise Glück, Billy Collins, Stanley Kunitz, Robert Pinsky, Robert Hass and Rita Dove.

The new Poet Laureate is the author of 28 books of poetry, novels for young adults and collections for children, most recently “Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes” (2014), a picture book showcasing inspirational Hispanic and Latino Americans. His most recent book of poems is “Senegal Taxi” (2013).

Herrera was born in Fowler, California, in 1948. As the son of migrant farm workers, he moved around often, living in tents and trailers along the road in Southern California, and attended school in a variety of small towns from San Francisco to San Diego. In 1972 he graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) with a bachelor’s degree in social anthropology. He then attended Stanford University, where he received a master’s degree in social anthropology, and in 1990 received a Masters of Fine Arts at the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Herrera has written over a dozen poetry collections, including “Half the World in Light: New and Selected Poems” (2008), which received the National Book Critics Circle Award and the International Latino Book Award. He is also a celebrated young adult and children’s book author. His honors include the Américas Award for both “Cinnamon Girl: letters found inside a cereal box” (2005) and “Crashboomlove: A Novel in Verse” (1999), as well as the Independent Publisher Book Award for “Featherless / Desplumado” (2005), the Ezra Jack Keats Award for “Calling the Doves” (1995) and the Pura Belpré Author Honor Award for both “Portraits of Hispanic American Heroes” and “Laughing Out Loud, I Fly” (1998).

For his poetry, Herrera has received two Latino Hall of Fame Poetry Awards, a PEN USA National Poetry Award, the PEN Oakland / Josephine Miles Award, a PEN / Beyond Margins Award, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Stanford University Chicano Fellows.

Herrera has served as the chair of the Chicano and Latin American Studies Department at California State University, Fresno, and held the Tomas Rivera Endowed Chair in the Creative Writing Department at the University of California, Riverside, where he taught until retiring in 2015. He is currently a visiting professor in the Department of American Ethnic Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. Elected as a chancellor for the Academy of American Poets in 2011, he also served as the Poet Laureate of California from 2012-2015.

Background of the Laureateship

The Poet Laureate is selected for a one-year term by the Librarian of Congress. The choice is based on poetic merit alone and has included a wide variety of poetic styles.

The Library keeps to a minimum the specific duties required of the Poet Laureate, who opens the literary season in the fall and closes it in May. Laureates, in recent years, have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.

In 2013-2014 Natasha Trethewey launched “Where Poetry Lives,” a series of on-location reports as part of the PBS NewsHour’s Poetry Series. These reports, in locations across the country, explored societal issues through poetry’s focused lens. For more information, visit www.pbs.org/newshour/tag/where-poetry-lives/.

Earlier, Rita Dove brought a program of poetry and jazz to the Library’s literary series, along with a reading by young Crow Indian poets and a two-day conference titled “Oil on the Waters: The Black Diaspora,” featuring panel discussions, readings and music. Robert Hass sponsored a major conference on nature writing called “Watershed,” which continues today as a national poetry competition for elementary, middle and high-school students, titled “River of Words.” Robert Pinsky initiated his Favorite Poem Project, which energized a nation of poetry readers to share their favorite poems in readings across the country and in audio and video recordings. Billy Collins instituted the website Poetry180, www.loc.gov/poetry/180/, which brought a poem a day into high-school classrooms in all parts of the country via the central announcement system.

Ten years ago, Ted Kooser created a free weekly newspaper column, at www.americanlifeinpoetry.org, that features a brief poem by a contemporary American poet and an introduction to the poem by Kooser. Donald Hall participated in the first-ever joint poetry readings of the U.S. Poet Laureate and British Poet Laureate Andrew Motion in a program called “Poetry Across the Atlantic,” co-sponsored by the Poetry Foundation. Kay Ryan launched “Poetry for the Mind’s Joy” in 2009-2010, a project that focused on the poetry being written by community-college students. The project included visits to various community colleges and a poetry contest on the campuses. For more information on Ryan’s project, visit www.loc.gov/poetry/mindsjoy/.

The Library of Congress’ Poetry and Literature Center is the home of the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, a position that has existed since 1936, when Archer M. Huntington endowed the Chair of Poetry at the Library. Since then, many of the nation’s most eminent poets have served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and, after the passage of Public Law 99-194 (Dec. 20, 1985), as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry. The Poet Laureate suggests authors to read in the literary series and plans other special events during the literary season.

At NPR

http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/10/412909814/juan-felipe-herrera-named-u-s-poet-laureate

At The Huffington Post

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/06/10/juan-felipe-herrera-poet-laureate_n_7550910.html

At The New York Times

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/10/books/juan-felipe-herrera-poet-laureate-with-a-working-class-voice-meant-to-be-spoken.html?_r=0

Even in Quiet Places By William Stafford

Even in quiet PlacesPublisher: Confluence Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2010)
Language: English
ISBN-10: 1881090167
ISBN-13: 978-1881090168
 
Review by S. M. Page
 
William Stafford’s Even in Quiet Places is outstanding poetry.  Stafford is one of the greats who controls form and line using lyrical conversational meter.  The book is divided into four sections.  The first three were published as chapbooks and the last a garnering of poems Stafford wrote as a project for U.S. Forest Service (several being put on signs and posted along wilderness trails in the Cascade Mountains—that alone is a monumental achievement).  I read the book four times, three as it is ordered by editor and son Kim Stafford, and once in the chronological order the sections were originally written.   I like my last reading best, as it gives me better sense of Stafford’s final years in regards to his style, theoretical, and spiritual growth.  His poems topic nature, environmental destruction, and human to human apathy; even more so, how short human life and consciousness are compared to the Earth’s:
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This From Lookout Point
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The cast here, in order of disappearance, were
dinosaurs, saber tooths, many birds, pioneers,
Shoshones, Wolverines, Wolves, Grizzlies,
For some reason they don’t come around much anymore.
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Also certain people have gone away—saints,
explorers.  They didn’t want to disturb the air.
All those tracks in river and sand—gone.
And their fires, the charcoal—all washed away.
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So sometimes I choose a cloud and let it
cross the sky floating me off there too.
Or a bird unravels its song and carries me
as it flies deeper and deeper into the woods.
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Such times, laments are not necessary.  You could
wait here all winter and the mountains would
just stand there.  They wouldn’t say anything.  Why
should they care?  Someday everything will be goon.
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Hey, let’s hurry down and forget this.
It gets cold here.
 
 
 
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S. M. Page at a lookout point S. M. Page is the author of The Timbre of Sand and Still Dandelions.  He holds degrees from Palomar College, Columbia University, and Bennington College.  He is the recipient of The Jess Cloud Memorial Prize for Poetry.  He loves to teach, spend time with his family, and wander through the woods communing with nature. 

Brake and Smith @ Poets on the Porch 2015

This is the third in a series highlighting poets reading at Poets on the Porch 2015 to be held on July 11th @ 1 p.m. at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park.

Mel BrakeMel Brake has won several awards for his poetry and musical talents. He was mel brake born and raised in Philadelphia, and proud of it. He lives in Springfield, PA because the water is fresh, clear and tasty. Many publications and journals have published his poems including Fox Chase Review, Philadelphia Poets, Mad Poets Review, E Pluribus Unum: An Anthology of Diverse Voices, Apiary Magazine, Word Riot Magazine, Poetry Ink, The New Verse News and many others. You can read the poetry of Mel Brake in the 2008 Winter, 2008 Autumn, 2009 Autumn and 2012 Summer Editions in our archives at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

John Richard SmithJohn Richard Smith John Smith’s poetry has appeared NJ Audubon since the 1980s and in numerous literary magazines. His work has also been anthologized in Under a Gull’s Wing: Poems and Photographs of the Jersey Shore and Liberty’s Vigil: The Occupy Anthology. His poem, “Lived Like a Saint,” which appeared in The Journal of New Jersey Poets, was set to music by Philadelphian composer, Tina Davidson, as part of a choral work, Listening to the Earth, commissioned by the New Jersey Parks Commission. Another poem, “Birding,” was commissioned by New Jersey Audubon for their centennial and “Red Moon,” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by US1. His book, Even That Indigo, was published was published by Hip Pocket Press in 2012. You can read the poetry of John Richard Smith in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/a14jsmith.html

Poets on the Porch 2015 – Preview

You can watch some of the poets reading at Poets on the Porch 2015 on youtube at the links below. Poets on the Porch 2015 will be held on July 11th @ 1 p.m. at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111

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Diane Sahms-Guarnieri

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qir5_xPSNiU

 

 

emariEmari DiGiorgio

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1WsS2eLVgAM

 

 

kimmikaKimmika Williams-Witherspoon

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CFpGUWnKME0

 

benBen Heins

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-6V5YNTuQ-I

 

 

Robert Milby 7Robert Milby

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pIF8Pwnn9AQ

 

 

mel brakeMel Brake

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7wjzTEaDKaw

 

 

Dave WorrellDave Worrell

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=518yT85jOV8

 

charlesCharles Carr

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3Jj8zmv8m4

 

 

A Look Back at Four Years of Poets on the Porch Festival

Poets on the Porch @ Ryerss

Poets on the Porch @ Ryerss

To have a look at our past Poets on the Porch in photographs please visit this link and enjoy: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157624536350361

Poets on the Porch 2015 will be held on July 11th at Ryerss Museum and Library. For more details about the poets reading please visit https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/poets-on-the-porch-2015/

 

Mundane, My Muse by Sunil Sharma

mundanemymusePublisher:            Authorspress

Binding:                Paperback

ISBN-13:               9788172738457

ISBN-10:               8172738455

Publisher Date: 2014

 

Review by P C K PREM

               Mundane life has charm and massive ennui too; and a man ought to find meaning even in tedium, and it is precisely what the poet confirms. Sunil’s lyrics speak emotively of routine incidents he gathers. He notices everything, collects tiny facets, deliberates in lonely hours and thereafter, gives expression. Mundane, My Muse carries a different pattern if one compares it to his earlier poetic endeavours.
                Life, a disturbed collection of experience and impressions, survives in fragmented times without cohesive objective. A City Collage offers glances of bigness in horrible globalized urban living, torments.
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In these breaking globalised urban realties,
Turning the glittering cities into ghettoes of mind
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A stressful knowledge appearing soothing visits in A February Afternoon. It is difficult to quantify tenderly multipart joys and sufferings, for human nature and humdrums permit not to understand life’s zeitgeist though man moves in radiant perceptible treats, market-psyche suggests.
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I cruise through this shadowy
Horizontal painting…
 .
Ugly display of urbanity and insensitive contempt in bargaining comforts signal cacophony, and give glimpses in A Supermarket in Mumbai Suburb.  Without obvious gratitude, a man realizes in dazzle of modernity a tragic irony, lives in illusory love that remains unfulfilled, and forgets anguish in vicarious joys with intrinsic guilt.  In highly mechanized system, he seeks joys in superficial gratification and absent present.
                Strangely, he is conscious of the agonies of not only city but also looks beyond and therefore, wants the rulers (like other poets) to look beyond metropolis, and asks to abandon political acrobats, and thinks of despair of the poor living in hunger and scarcity. Somewhere, he halts, looks around and finds desolation man has brought in nature, nature that constructs aesthetic prototypes of continuity. A question perturbs why man strips nature of its divine adornment. Human nature wants joys, looks at poverty and scarcity, feels anguished, watches a miserable being and expresses pity but finds no reasonable passage, and therefore, it turns into aching encumbrances. A disheartening passivity haunts certain poems and the bard juxtaposes nature and man’s tiny caustic acts to evaluate empathies absent.
                Humanism wakes up and the awful wordy supremacy is noticeable as the lyricist issues a subtle warning in Bring your Words. If he speaks of bristly tribulations of metro life, he touches human relationship gently and wants lasting proximity and warmth and perhaps, the poet tells man of life-giving human bonds even in grudging truths life offers. Relations provide flashes of enduring joys and memories warm. Relations if separated make life barren and animalize it. He pays tribute to daughters, when he says, ‘Little Goddesses /Need to be fiercely /Protected and guarded /By all of us!’
Elsewhere, he observes –
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Fathers are the guys, who impart real lessons of life,
They look tough but often cry, hiding hot tears…
 .
                Perhaps, the poet talks of a perennial truth despite apparent dichotomy in feelings, thoughts and the spirit of age, an age grappling for a solid fulcrum. Insensitivity in relations stays on as even mothers fall victims to false and rudimentary contemporary value system where man loses warmth. Even mothers suffer, and inhuman treatment reveals hypocritical approach.
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And thus cleverly enslaved Mother
An old rheumatic woman,
To the small smelly kitchen
For the remaining of her sad lonely life.
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Plight of workers and apathetic cities haunt lyrics frequently. He cannot escape comparison between a life of affluence and scarceness, and invokes sympathies of ostensibly powerful people. Women from the elite strata live a highly rich life (?) while a poor woman is archetype of sufferings.
              He talks of miseries of workers at construction sites as hopes linger on for filling bellies with the residue of what they earn. Growth and democracy are irrelevant when sufferings assault. (Excluded Ones). Living away from homeland, goads to ventilate woes saturating mindset of people, who stay away and settle down elsewhere to earn living. Immigrants fail in locating solid relations even though they sell perspiration and time.
              Tormenting loneliness amidst crowd makes life complex.   He laments at the scornful attitude of artists towards art and life, a naked semblance Lonely. Life is destined to trouble man in visible delight but sickening effects of metros distort and rip apart bonds, and drive man to Silky shadows
              A young couple keeps searching love and  understanding in ‘surging crowds’ and pays a long agonized tribute to Love/Living in Indian Metro for man fails to recognize, ‘The contemporary idiom/Of urban/Love and romance’ because rainbow-like dreams of emerging middle class become history unrealized. A middle class life in undefined feelings of miserly and rich life with giggles and groans, is a fact as it hugs and kisses love coldly in an abandoned but swarming metro. Freshness in life of a modern man is a mirage, and a contemptuous scenario scares.
           Even in freshness of experiences, one confronts monotony and witnesses end of a dream life in metros.  One notices festive life but feels aghast at the miseries workers and women face in deplorable living conditions. He feels for the downtrodden and laments that freedom did not bring happy change in the life of fellow Indians, notwithstanding awesome growth and material progress. Gaps in living appear glaring and defeat claims of happiness and here ‘stark contrast’ delineates a depressing picture.
           Man is responsible for many miseries on earth, for not for a while he restrains greed and exploitation and often invites fury of nature bringing horrific cataclysm. If natural upheavals make life appalling and frightening, man is the offender, for he fails to contain nature’s ferocity despite solemn assertions.
          Sunil analyzes insightfully daily experiences about animate and inanimate objects he observes, finds logic and faint unanimity in personal and social regions without philosophizing, and still demonstrates genuine anxiety about life and existence.
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You can find the book here: http://www.uread.com/book/mundane-my-muse-poems-sunil/9788172738457

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pckP C K Prem (p c katoch of Malkher-Garh Palampur, a former civil servant and Member PSC, Himachal), an author of more than forty-five books in English and Hindi, post-graduated in English literature from Punjab University, Chandigarh, has  nine volumes of poetry besides books on criticism.  Katoch Prem is a poet, novelist, short story writer and critic in English from Himachal Pradesh, India.

Worrell and Schermer @ Poets on the Porch 2015

This is the second in a series highlighting poets reading at Poets on the Porch 2015 to be held on July 11th @ 1 p.m. at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park.

Dave WorrellDave Worrell studied literature and philosophy at Union College in beautiful Schenectady, New York. His poems have appeared in The Fox Chase Review, US 1 Worksheets, Mad Poets Review and Wild River Review. He has performed poems at Chris’ Jazz Café in Philadelphia and Cafe Improv in Princeton.  His latest collection is We Who Were Bound. You can read the poetry of Dave Worrell in the 2009 Autumn and 2013 Autumn Editions in our archives at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

SchermerWendy Schermer was born in Detroit, grew up in Philadelphia, and is now a resident of Arden, Delaware, where she has lived for the past eight years. Wendy shares her home with a dog and two cats who have been steadfast companions since her two sons became adults and made lives of their own in Philadelphia and Brooklyn, respectively. Although Wendy works full-time for the State of New Jersey’s Judiciary, her real love is writing. You can read the poetry of Wendy Schermer in the 2012 Autumn and 2013 Autumn Editions in our archives at this link:  http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

Poetry and Poets in the News

newspaper-reporter-typewriter

Oxford poetry needs to broaden its accent

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/01/oxford-poetry-needs-to-broaden-its-accent-wole-soyinka-simon-armitage

Dread of literary parties led Philip Larkin to shun Oxford poetry professorship

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/jun/01/philip-larkins-refusal-of-oxford-poetry-professor-nomination-discovered

Schild finalist for poetry award

http://www.winonapost.com/Article/ArticleID/44431/Schild-finalist-for-poetry-award

Poet Terrance Hayes On ‘The Poetics Of Liquid’

http://kuow.org/post/poet-terrance-hayes-poetics-liquid

Olivia Gatwood Poetry Video Goes Viral

http://www.adweek.com/galleycat/olivia-gatwood-poetry-video-goes-viral/104166

Louise Glück awarded Gold Medal for Poetry

http://news.yale.edu/2015/05/29/louise-gl-ck-awarded-gold-medal-poetry

An evening of poetry

http://www.thehindu.com/features/metroplus/an-evening-of-poetry/article7264768.ece

OPERA REVIEW: Whitman’s poetry shadows Matthew Aucoin’s ‘Crossing’

http://www.patriotledger.com/article/20150601/ENTERTAINMENT

/150609745/2052/ENTERTAINMENT

The Prison House of Post-Internet Poetry: A Critical Look at the Poetry of the New Museum’s Triennial

http://hyperallergic.com/204402/the-prison-house-of-post-internet-poetry-a-critical-look-at-the-poetry-of-the-new-museums-triennial/

Caution: World-Changing Poetry at Work

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/05/25/caution-world-changing-poetry-at-work.html

Exploring the last Mughal’s poetry as it intertwined with his life

http://www.hindustantimes.com/art/exploring-the-last-mughal-s-poetry-as-it-intertwined-with-his-life/article1-1353232.aspx

What Poet Robinson Jeffers Can Teach Christians

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/reverend-dr-malcolm-clemens-young/what-poet-robinson-jeffer_b_7472746.html

Church opens its archive on poet WB Yeats

http://www.newsletter.co.uk/news/church-opens-its-archive-on-poet-wb-yeats-1-6774363

No foul play in death of Chilean poet Neruda, researchers say

http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/05/28/us-chile-neruda-idUSKBN0OD1QD20150528

Libyan poet wins international recognition

http://www.libyaherald.com/2015/05/29/libyan-poet-wins-international-recognition/#axzz3bunq25xd

Carl Sandburg Home preserves life of poet

http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/local/2015/05/29/carl-sandburg-home-preserves-life-poet/28161273/

The Plum Tree Tavern – Eco Friendly and Open to Submissions

plum treeRussell Streur, longtime barkeep of The Camel Saloon is branching out so to speak. He has established a new literary site, The Plum Tree Tavern to focus on short works on nature and ecology. Longer works of eco-poetry will also be considered.

Russell Streur-Barkeep

Russell Streur-Barkeep

The Plum Tree Tavern is located at:  http://theplumtreetavern.blogspot.com/  Submissions may be sent to plumtreetavern@gmail.com ; submitters should  read the guidelines. We wish Russell the best with this new endeavor.

Davis and Carr @ Poets on the Porch 2015

This is the first in a series highlighting poets reading at Poets on the Porch 2015 to be held on July 11th @ 1 p.m. at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park.

rhdavis-1Robert Hambling Davis is a fiction editor of The Fox Chase Review. He has been published in The Sun, Antietam Review, Memoir (and), Philadelphia Stories, Santa Monica Review, and elsewhere. He’s been nominated for two Pushcart Prizes, and received three Delaware Division of the Arts grants, two for fiction and one for creative nonfiction. He was a fiction semifinalist in the William Faulkner Creative Writing Contest in 2002 and 2012, and a creative nonfiction winner in 2013. Robert helps direct the Delaware Literary Connection, a nonprofit serving writers in Delaware and surrounding areas. He is a member of the Delaware Artist Roster, and has given writing workshops and readings in the Mid-Atlantic. You can read the fiction of Robert Hambling Davis in The Fox Chase Review in the Summer 2011 edition at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

charlesCharles Carr is a native Philadelphian. Charles was educated at LaSalle and Bryn Mawr College, where he earned a Masters in American History.  Charles has worked in social and community development services for 40 years.  Charles has also been active in raising funds for various missions and organizations serving the poorest of the poor In Haiti.   In 2009 Cradle Press of St. Louis published Charles’s first book of poetry: paradise, pennsylvania. In January of this year, Haitian Mud Pies And Other Poems published by The Moonstone Arts Center was released.  Charles’ poems have been published in various print and on-line local and national poetry journals.   Charles also hosts the Moonstone Poetry series at Fergie’s Pub in Center City Philadelphia once per month. You can read the poetry of Charles Carr in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/a14ccarr.html