Category Archives: poetry magazine

In the Words of Poets- Why Poetry Readings?

Why poetry readings? We gleaned some answers from poets we interviewed for our, 10 Questions Interview Series .

472“After a year of touring, I actually started to feel more confident reading my poems to an audience.  With confidence, I believe my “reading” performance has been enhanced.  I have come to the conclusion that there are poems that are “page” poems and “audience” poems.  To elaborate, “page” poems are more complicated and/or heady poems and are meant for a reader to read and re-read slowly, calmly, and in the confines of solitude.  “Audience” poems are those poems that are more musical and/or narrative in nature, which make it easier for the listener to follow, as you read with rhythm, feeling, proper breathing, and annunciation.  By reading and re-reading poems aloud, you learn how to accent the poem where you want the listener to really hear and feel what you are reading. “– Diane Sahms-Guarnieri – Philadelphia, Pa.

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Jack Veasey“Largely that they enable you to finish the act of communication. If you write because you have things to say, that’s essential. Otherwise, you’re just talking to yourself. As far as getting reactions and feedback go – that really isn’t the reason you do it. And you have to be happy with it by your own standards regardless of whatever reaction it gets, or doesn’t get. You don’t do it for the reaction, but you do create the work, most of the time, in order to be able to share it. Then it’s out of your hands.”- Jack Veasey, Hummelstown, Pa.

kimmika“I perform because I have to! The poetry keeps me alive. It demands to be written and it demands to be heard…I’m just the vehicle. I’ve always said, if I couldn’t be a poet, I would probably be a preacher. I don’t know. I see the world this way…as poetry, and songs and stories. My first language is poetry. I write because if I didn’t I don’t know if I would be able to breathe. And I guess I perform for the same reason I still pray…everybody has got to have something to believe in!”- Kimmika Williams Witherspoon, Philadelphia

jane“I’m glad to speak the poems and hear how they sound in a larger auditory space rather than mumbled in front of the computer screen, but I’m always nervous. Some of my poems have visual quirks that can’t be relayed.” – Jane Lewty, Amsterdam, Netherlands

stephen-page-in-front-of-wheat-photo“Reading aloud to an audience is a public event, a gift shared with more than one person in linear time.  I discovered by reading my own stuff aloud, especially while I practiced reading aloud to myself, I caught the glitches in the lines, the skips in the meter, the loss of the music I thought was there.  Thus, by reading aloud, or preparing to read aloud, I was better able to edit my work.” – Stephen Page- Buenos Aires, Argentina

va 1“In fact I love doing live readings. It gives you an opportunity to connect with the pulse of your readers. Gives you instant feedback about your work and the joy of seeing your words settle in people’s hearts. The experience is quite matchless! I’ve had youngsters approach me with endearing trepidation after my readings asking if they could keep in touch with me…I’ve had older, established poets come forth and comment on what they see as strengths in my poetry. These are all the delightful fall outs of live readings! Also, when you read live, you portray not just your work but the entire ethos to which you belong. The way you dress, the way you carry yourself and the way you interact with fellow poets also helps to convey your sensibilities as a poet. It’s a wholesome experience that goes beyond the scope of mere words”. – Vinita Agrawl, Mumbai India

john dorsey“I travel constantly. As far as how important it is, that really depends on why you’re out there. Do you want to sell books? Are you attempting to build lifelong friendships? Unless you have really bad social anxiety, I think everyone should try to get out there. I myself need the book sales to eat more often than not, but the friendships that I’ve made outweigh $10 here, $20 there  or some silly idea of fame, when 99 percent of people could care less about poetry anyway.” – John Dorsey, Cleveland, Ohio

linda-nemec-foster-2“Let’s be honest:  being a poet can be a lonely profession.  The creating, crafting, and revising of poems demand concentration, time, energy, and discipline.  For me, it is very important to “get out into the world” and share my work with audiences on a regular basis.  Some poets don’t like to give readings and/or are not very good at public presentations.  I’ve heard some famous poets give awkward, poor readings and some relatively unknown poets give wonderful readings.  The bottom line is that a poem should be strong on the page and in the voice.  After all, poetry started as a purely oral tradition long before the invention of paper, the letterpress, or the laptop.” Linda Nemec Foster, Michigan

thad 4“I’m usually able to make a connection. I remember reciting a piece on the top deck of a boat on the way from Hong Kong to Lama Island. Two people were listening, one from Australia and one from England. We were just lying there in the warm air. I was interrupted by our cruise host, but after the host left, the Englishwoman said to me, “Do the rest of it. I want to hear how it ends.” – Thaddeus Rutkowski, New York

Kristina 124 (1)“I have been writing since I was a young girl. Reading my work aloud, however, is something I have only done in the last eight to ten years. At first, I was very reluctant to stand up in front of an audience and read. I prefer the quiet, solitary process of writing. But, at some point, I realized that my poems needed to be heard. I had something to say and, even if it only reached one person, I needed to say it.” –Kristina Moriconi- Montgomery County, Pa.

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Robert Milby 7 “I enjoy reading in states outside of my home state, New York. Performance is vital.  To paraphrase the great Harry Chapin:  “You must seduce the audience over and over.” It is important to keep the crowds’ interest.  A poet can connect with his or her audience in many ways. It is up to the novice and/or younger poet to go to readings and study the poet onstage.  Take notes if need be.” Robet Milby, Hudson Valley New York

 

Coming Soon….The Winter 2015 Edition of The Fox Chase Review

The Banks of the Pennypack Creek in Philadelphia

The Banks of the Pennypack Creek in Philadelphia

The winter 2015 edition of The Fox Chase Review is now in production. This edition will feature:

Poetry by:

M.P. Carver, Colin Dardis, Marty Esworthy, Melanie Eyth,  Gene Halus, Phil Linz, Gloria Monaghan, Stephen Page,  Chad Parenteau,  Prabha Nayak Prabhu,  Felino A. Soriano, Jack Veasey,  Lee Varon

Fiction by:

Ramona Long, Mary Pauer, Jeffrey Voccola

 

Pisan Carrots – Thanksgiving 2014 Menu Poems at Blazevox

Painting by Donna White

Painting by Donna White

http://www.scribd.com/doc/248058629/Thanksgiving-2014-a-Menu-Poem-by-Geoffrey-Gatza

Readers Choice- Top Twenty Book Reviews at The FCR for 2014

Our list of the top twenty books reviewed at The Fox Chase Review Blog for 2014 based on readership. 
poem continuous us edition

Poem Continuous – Reincarnated Expressions – By Bibhas Roy Chowdhury- Translated by Kiriti Sengupta

my glass of wine

My Glass Of Wine by Kiriti Sengupta

LivingOffTheCountryCover

Living Off the Country By John Haines

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Golden Cacti by Sunil Sharma

lastcowboys1

The Last Cowboys at the End of the World By Nick Reding

soouth

My South by Southwest – A Cast Iron Tempo Recollection by Elizabeth Stelling

chekcover

Celebrity Chekhov By Ben Greenman

words-not-spoken

Words Not Spoken by Vinita Agrawal

I ATE

I Ate the Cosmos for Breakfast by Melissa Studdard

sound-of

Sound of the Ax: Aphorisms and Poems by William Stafford

lucky-bones

Lucky Bones by Peter Meinke

prin

Principles of Belonging by Joshua Gray

bloom

Bloom in Reverse by Teresa Leo

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Red Seeps – Droplets of Doubt, Destiny and Devotion in Verse by Sadia Riaz Sehole

meena-kumari-the-poet-book-review

Meena Kumari the Poet : A Life Beyond Cinema- Translated by Noorul Hasan

shehadsomehorsespbkbig

She Had Some Horses by Jay Harjo

longwayback

Long Way Back to the End by Paul B. Roth

illuminated

In the Illuminated Dark- Selected Poems by Tuvia Ruebner

church-of-the-adagio

Church of the Adagio by Philip Dacey

yarbrough-book_

 A Sort of Adam Infant Dropped: True Myths by R. Scott Yarbrough

The Fox Chase Review Autumn 2014 Poets

Autum 2014 Cover

http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/autumn-poetry-2014.html

FCR Broadsides 14-15 and 14-16 Available on November 30th

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Our Broadside Series continues with 14-15 and 14-16 printed in a limited edition of 30 copies.  Broadside 14-15, an excerpt from the poem, For Etheridge Knight by Jeffrey Ethan Lee and 14-16, Perception of Nails by Lynette G. Esposito. These broadsides will be available on November 30th at our Featured Poet/Writer Reading with Jeffrey Ethan Lee and Lynette G. Esposito at Ryerss Museum and Library. More information at this link: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2014/10/31/esposito-and-lee-in-fox-chase-november-30th/

The Autumn 2014 Edition of The Fox Chase Review is Now Available

Autum 2014 Cover

The Autumn 2014 Edition of The Fox Chase Review is now live on line. We are pleased to present the following poets and writers.

Poetry by: Charles Carr, Bibhas Roy Chowdhury/Kiriti Sengupta, Noah Cutler, Emari DiGiorgio , James Guth, Ben Heins, David Livewell, Maria Massington, Laren McClung, Kelly McQuain,  Robert Milby,  John Richard Smith,  Changmin Yuan,  Jason Wright

Fiction by: Dennis Lawson and Danny Johnson

www.thefoxchasereview.org

Thanks to our staff: Poetry Editor Diane Sahms-Guarnieri, Fiction Editors Russell Reece and Robert Hambling Davis and Web Editor Katie Reutter.

Wunder and Rosenbloom in Fox Chase – October 26th

The Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present our Featured Poets/Writers Reading on October 26th with Bill Wunder and Robert Rosenbloom at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. .  The reading will begin @ 1 p.m. in the second floor gallery of the museum. The features will be followed by an open reading.

BillWunderBill Wunder is the author of Pointing at the Moon (WordTech Editions, 2008), Hands Turning the Earth (Wordtech Communications 2014), and a chapbook, A Season of Storms (Via Dolorosa Press, 2002.) In 2004, he was named Poet Laureate of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. His poems have been widely published, and he has twice been nominated for the Pushcart Prize in poetry. Bill has been a finalist numerous times in The T. S. Eliot Prize, and the Allen Ginsberg Poetry Awards. In 2010, he was nominated for a Pew Fellowship in the Arts. He has read and lectured in local schools, colleges, festivals, book stores, libraries, and on public television. Bill serves as Poetry Editor of The Schuylkill Valley Journal. You can read the poetry of Bill Wunder in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11WS/BillWunder.html

RosenbloomRobert Rosenbloom hosts a monthly poetry reading at the Bridgewater Public Library for the Somerset Poetry Group. His poetry has appeared in the Paterson Literary Review and Lips. He’s the author of a chapbook, Reunion, published by Finishing Line Press. His day job is lawyer. He lives with his wife in Bound Brook. You can read the poetry of Robert Rosenbloom in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/Rosenbloom.html

Wittle and Lowenthal Bring Autumn to Ryerss

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Featured readers MM WIttle and Rodger Lowenthal welcomed Autumn to Ryerss with a colorful reading. The featured readers were followed by an open mic with Wendy Schermer, Maria Keane, Elizabeth Rivers and Alice Wootson.

Please view photographs of the event here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

Next up in Fox Chase: Bill Wunder and Robert Rosenbloom Oct. 26th

Our Nominations for Best of the Net

bestofthenet

Poetry:

Beauty by Nathalie Anderson http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14nanderson.html

Work Song by Jose Angel Araguz http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/s14-jaaraguz.html

Philadelphia Hipster by Peter Baroth http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/s14-pbaroth.html

Cry of my empty womb by Salvwi Prasad http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/s14sprasad.html

Spring at Dames Quarter by Russell Reece http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14rreece.html

Martyr’s Day by Dennis Daly http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14ddaly.html

Fiction:

Sleeping on the Couch by George Wyelsol http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14gwyelsol.html

Bed by Beverly Romain http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/s14-bromain.html