Tag Archives: Alice Wootson

Report from Poets on the Porch 2015

Diane Sahms-Guarnieri by F Omar Telan at Poets on the Porch 2015

Diane Sahms-Guarnieri by F Omar Telan at Poets on the Porch 2015

The Fox Chase Reading Series has concluded its run with Poets on the Porch 2015. It was a beautiful afternoon on the porch of Ryerss Museum and Library atop the hill at Burholme Park in Philadelphia, Pa. The crowd enjoyed a great reading of poetry under cover of the porch on a warm July day. Thanks to all the poets who shared their work, our hosts, F Omar Telan and Bruce Kramer and our book table monitor Nancy Sahms.

First Set Host F Omar Telan

First Set Host F Omar Telan

The first set was hosted by F Omar Telan and energized the crowd. Poets reading in the first set were:

Poet Diane Sahms-Guarnieri

Poet Diane Sahms-Guarnieri

Poet Emari DiGiorgio

Poet Emari DiGiorgio

Poet Maria Keane

Poet Maria Keane

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Poet  Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon

Poet Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon

 

 

 

 

Poet Gene Halus

Poet Gene Halus

Poet Russell Reece

Poet Russell Reece

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Ben Heins

Poet Ben Heins

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Poet g emil reutter

Poet g emil reutter

 

 

 

 

 

 

Host of Second Set Bruce Kramer

Host of Second Set Bruce Kramer

The second set was hosted by Bruce Kramer breezing to a beautiful conclusion. Poets reading in the second set were:

Poet Alice Wootson

Poet Alice Wootson

Poet Mel Brake

Poet Mel Brake

Poet Dave Worrell

Poet Dave Worrell

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Poet Wendy Schermer

Poet Wendy Schermer

Poet Charles Carr

Poet Charles Carr

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More photographs of Poets on the Porch 2015 can be viewed at our Flickr at this link:

Scenes from Poets on the Porch 2015

Poets on the Porch 2015 – July 11th @ 1 p.m.

THE FOX CHASE READING  SERIES

Presents

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POETS ON THE PORCH 2015 – July 11th @ 1 p.m.

Ryerss Museum and Library

7370 Central Avenue, Philadlephia, Pa. 19111

Hosted by: F Omar Telan and Bruce Kramer 

The Poets

??????????????????????????????? Diane Sahms-Guarnieri, a native Philadelphian, is the author of two full-length poetry collections: Images of Being (Stone Garden Publishing, 2011) and Night Sweat (Red Dashboard Press, forthcoming in January, 2016). She has been published in The Philadelphia Inquirer, Pennsylvania Literary Journal, Many Mountains Moving, Philadelphia Stories, Blue Collar Review, and Wilderness House Literary Review, among others. Awarded a grant in poetry from the AEV Foundation in 2013, she currently serves as Poet in Residence at Ryerss Museum and Library and as Poetry Editor of the Fox Chase Review. More about Diane can be found at http://www.dianesahms-guarnieri.com/  & https://dianesahmsguarnieri.wordpress.com/

Emari DiGiorgio makes a mean arugula quesadilla and has split-boarded the emariTasman Glacier. She teaches at The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and is a Poet-in-the-Schools through the state arts council and the Dodge Poetry Foundation. Recent poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Arsenic Lobster, Mead, the Raleigh Review, Smartish Pace, and Verse. http://edigiorgio.wix.com/emaridigiorgio

KeaneMaria J. Keane is a visual artist, educator and published poet.  She received her B.A. from Hunter College, N.Y.C. and a Master in Art History from the University of Delaware (Phi Kappa Phi). She is an Arts and Letters member of the National League of American Pen Women and an artist member of the historic Howard Pyle Studio in Wilmington, Delaware. She served as an Adjunct Professor of Fine Arts and Art History at Wilmington University (New Castle Campus, from 1984 to 2009.) http://www.artsicle.com/Maria-Keane

Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon, PhD  (Cultural Anthropology), M.A. kimmika(Anthropology), MFA (Theater), Graduate Certificate) Women’s Studies, B.A. (Journalism); is an Associate Professor of Urban Theater and Community Engagement in the Theater Department at Temple University. The author of Through Smiles and Tears: The History of African American Theater (From Kemet to the Americas) (Lambert Academic Publishing, 2011); The Secret Messages in African American Theater: Hidden Meaning Embedded in Public Discourse” (Edwin Mellen Publishing, 2006) She is a recipient of the 2013 Associate Provosts Arts Grant; 2008 Seed Grant, 2003 Provost’s Arts Grant; 2001 Independence Foundation Grant, the 2000 PEW fellowship, and1999,  DaimlerChrysler National Poetry Competition. Williams-Witherspoon is a contributing poet to 26 anthologies and recipient of a host of awards and citations. http://www.2deep2.com/

Gene HalusA native of the Lawndale neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa., Gene Halus is an Associate Professor of Politics at Immaculata University. He earned his Bachelor of Arts from LaSalle University, he graduated with a double major from the department of History and Political Science, his Masters of Art and his Ph.D., from the Department of Politics of the Catholic University of America. Halus has been a community/social activist in the United States and Ireland. He has written several op-ed pieces for various newspapers including the Souderton Independent and the Lancaster Eagle Gazette. He has written articles on topics such as German-Americans of Northeast Philadelphia and Resurgent Ethnicity: Reconsidering Ethnicity, Whiteness, and Assimilation; At Frankford We Stand!: The Mobilization of Euro-American Ethnic Consciousness in Philadelphia Neighborhoods and Changes in City Government; and Fair Housing/Fair Lending. Halus is working on a new poetry collection titled Perkiomen using the Perkiomen Creek as the focus of the cycle of poems. His most recent book is Irish Americans: The History and Culture of a People, co-authored with William E. Watson released in November of 2014.

Russell Reece has had stories and essays published in Memoir (and), russCrimespree Magazine, The Fox Chase Review and many other print and on-line journals. His work has appeared several anthologies most recently Proud to Be: Writing by American Warriors, released in 2012. All That Glitters, released in 2013 and Someone Wicked released in 2013. He has received two Best of the Net nominations and was a finalist in the 2012 William Faulkner/ William Wisdom Creative Writing Contest.  He placed first in the Delaware Press Association Annual Communications award in poetry and a 2015 fellowship from The Delaware Division of the Arts. Russ is a University of Delaware alumnus and a co-host of 2nd Saturday Poets in Wilmington, Delaware. He lives in Bethel, Delaware in rural Sussex County along the beautiful Broad Creek. You can learn more about Russ by visiting his website at www.russellreece.com

benBen Heins is the author of two chapbooks of poetry: Cut Me Free (Crisis Chronicles Press, 2014) and Greatest Hits & B-Sides (Vagabondage Press, 2012). In addition to teaching first-year writing at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey and Rowan University, he is an active member of the South Jersey Poets Collective. http://www.benheins.com

 

Alice Greenhowe Wootson grew up in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. alice 3She attended Cheyney University and earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education. After graduating, she married and remained in the Philadelphia area. She earned a Masters Degree in Education and Reading Specialist Certification and taught in the public schools. Alice is the award-winning author of ten romance novels and an award-winning poet; she has taught writing workshops for numerous groups. She is also a board member of the Philadelphia Writers Conference. Alice Wootson is an active member of Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church of Philadelphia. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband, Isaiah. http://www.alicewootson.net/

Robert Milby 7Robert Milby, of Florida, NY has been reading his poetry in public since March, 1995.   He is the author of 6 chapbooks, most recently: Dickens’ Pet Raven (Fierce Grace Press, Wilmington, DE, 2014).  His first book of poetry is Ophelia’s Offspring (Foothills Publishing, Kanona, NY, 2007).  Second book: Victorian House:  Ghosts and Gothic Poems will be published by Black Bed Sheet Books, Antelope, CA in 2014.   Robert hosts 3 Hudson Valley, NY poetry readings and has read his work in NY, NYC, NJ, PA and New England.  He is a listed poet with Poets & Writers, Inc. of NYC.  He writes for the arts magazine, Heyday Magazine and the arts newspaper, The Delaware and Hudson CANVAS.    www.robertmilby.com

Mel Brake has won several awards for his poetry and musical talents. He was mel brakeborn and raised in Philadelphia, and proud of it. He lives in Springfield, PA because the water is fresh, clear and tasty. Many publications and journals have published his poems including Fox Chase Review, Philadelphia Poets, Mad Poets Review, E Pluribus Unum: An Anthology of Diverse Voices, Apiary Magazine, Word Riot Magazine, Poetry Ink, The New Verse News and many others https://www.facebook.com/mel.brake

John Richard SmithJohn Smith’s poetry has appeared NJ Audubon since the 1980s and in numerous literary magazines. His work has also been anthologized in Under a Gull’s Wing: Poems and Photographs of the Jersey Shore and Liberty’s Vigil: The Occupy Anthology. His poem, “Lived Like a Saint,” which appeared in The Journal of New Jersey Poets, was set to music by Philadelphian composer, Tina Davidson, as part of a choral work, Listening to the Earth, commissioned by the New Jersey Parks Commission. Another poem, “Birding,” was commissioned by New Jersey Audubon for their centennial and “Red Moon,” was nominated for a Pushcart Prize by US1. His book, Even That Indigo, was published was published by Hip Pocket Press in 2012. https://www.facebook.com/JohnSmithFrenchtownPoet?fref=nf

Dave Worrell studied literature and philosophy at Union College in beautiful Dave WorrellSchenectady, New York. His poems have appeared in The Fox Chase Review, US 1 Worksheets, Mad Poets Review and Wild River Review. He has performed poems at Chris’ Jazz Café in Philadelphia and Cafe Improv in Princeton.  His latest collection is We Who Were Bound. https://www.linkedin.com/in/daveworrell

Wendy Schermer was born in Detroit, grew up in Philadelphia, and is now a Schermer
resident of Arden, Delaware, where she has lived for the past eight years. Wendy shares her home with a dog and two cats who have been steadfast companions since her two sons became adults and made lives of their own in Philadelphia and Brooklyn, respectively. Although Wendy works full-time for the State of New Jersey’s Judiciary, her real love is writing.

rhdavis-1Robert Hambling Davis is a fiction editor of The Fox Chase Review. He has been published in The Sun, Antietam Review, Memoir (and), Philadelphia Stories, Santa Monica Review, and elsewhere. He’s been nominated for two Pushcart Prizes, and received three Delaware Division of the Arts grants, two for fiction and one for creative nonfiction. He was a fiction semifinalist in the William Faulkner Creative Writing Contest in 2002 and 2012, and a creative nonfiction winner in 2013. Robert helps direct the Delaware Literary Connection, a nonprofit serving writers in Delaware and surrounding areas. He is a member of the Delaware Artist Roster, and has given writing workshops and readings in the Mid-Atlantic.

Charles Carr is a native Philadelphian. Charles was educated at LaSalle and charlesBryn Mawr College, where he earned a Masters in American History.  Charles has worked in social and community development services for 40 years.  Charles has also been active in raising funds for various missions and organizations serving the poorest of the poor In Haiti.   In 2009 Cradle Press of St. Louis published Charles’s first book of poetry: paradise, pennsylvania. In January of this year, Haitian Mud Pies And Other Poems published by The Moonstone Arts Center was released.  Charles’ poems have been published in various print and on-line local and national poetry journals.   Charles also hosts the Moonstone Poetry series at Fergie’s Pub in Center City Philadelphia once per month.

Your Hosts

kramerBruce Kramer is a writer from Philadelphia. Most of his work has appeared in boring technical documents, medical publications, and marketing propaganda, but he has also been published in the occasional magazine and literary publication. He believes in cold beer, rock and roll, and baseball. He sometimes acts like he is named after Bruce Springsteen, but he knows he is named after somebody much cooler. He has poetry forthcoming from Barrelhouse Magazine

F Omar Telan shares a New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding TelanbyCristinOKeefeAptowiczPerformance Art Production for Too Much Light Makes The Baby Go Blind with the New York Neo-Futurists. A selection of his plays are anthologized in 225 Plays from Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind.

His poetry has been published in “A Gathering Of The Tribes”, “Apiary Magazine”, “The Fox Chase Review”, “Our Own Voice”. He has read his poetry at the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church (NYC), the Kelly Writers House (Philadelphia), the National Asian American Poetry Festival (NYC), the Philippine Embassy (DC), and the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival (Waterloo Village, NJ).

With Asians Misbehavin’ he has performed in the New York Fringe Festival, the Philadelphia Fringe Festival, and at Roundhouse Performance Centre (Vancouver). He directed “The Edge Of The World” which was performed at La Mama E.T.C. (NYC) as part of the Asian American Theater Festival.

He graduated from Emerson College and the Radcliffe Publishing Course. http://www.telan.org/

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-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA). He can be found at https://gereutter.wordpress.com/about/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wootson and Milby @ Poets on the Porch 2015

This is the fourth in a series highlighting poets reading at Poets on the Porch 2015 to be held on July 11th @ 1 p.m. at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park.

alice 4Alice Greenhowe Wootson grew up in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She attended Cheyney University and earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education. After graduating, she married and remained in the Philadelphia area. She earned a Masters Degree in Education and Reading Specialist Certification and taught in the public schools. Alice is the award-winning author of ten romance novels and an award-winning poet; she has taught writing workshops for numerous groups. She is also a board member of the Philadelphia Writers Conference. Alice Wootson is an active member of Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church of Philadelphia. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband, Isaiah. You can read the poetry and fiction of Alice Wootson in the 2008 Winter, 2010 Summer and 2013 Winter Editions of The Fox Chase Review in our archives at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

Robert Milby 7Robert Milby , of Florida, NY has been reading his poetry in public since March, 1995.   He is the author of 6 chapbooks, most recently: Dickens’ Pet Raven (Fierce Grace Press, Wilmington, DE, 2014).  His first book of poetry is Ophelia’s Offspring (Foothills Publishing, Kanona, NY, 2007).  Second book: Victorian House:  Ghosts and Gothic Poems will be published by Black Bed Sheet Books, Antelope, CA in 2014.   Robert hosts 3 Hudson Valley, NY poetry readings and has read his work in NY, NYC, NJ, PA and New England.  He is a listed poet with Poets & Writers, Inc. of NYC.  He writes for the arts magazine, Heyday Magazine and the arts newspaper, The Delaware and Hudson CANVAS. You can read the poetry of Robert Milby in The Fox Chase Review at this link:  http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/a14rmilby.html

10 Questions for Alice Wootson

alice 3Alice Greenhowe Wootson grew up in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She attended Cheyney University and earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Elementary Education. After graduating, she married and remained in the Philadelphia area. She earned a Masters Degree in Education and Reading Specialist Certification and taught in the public schools. Alice is the award-winning author of ten romance novels and an award-winning poet; she has taught writing workshops for numerous groups. She is also a board member of the Philadelphia Writers Conference. Alice Wootson is an active member of Enon Tabernacle Baptist Church of Philadelphia. She lives in Philadelphia with her husband, Isaiah. http://www.alicewootson.net/

Interview with g emil reutter

The Interview 

alice 2GER: You have published a large body of work in the genre of Romance Novels. What drew you to this genre?

AW: I write romance novels because I like happpy endings.

GER: Some have described your novels as realistic romance full of suspense with out of the ordinary plot twists. How does this set you apart from others in the genre?

AW: I add twists to my novels because I don’t want the story to ‘unfold in a straight line’ and I don’t want the reader to reach the end and say ”I knew that’s what was going to happen.”  

BorderLove-2GER: You latest release is Border Love. Please tell us about the book?

AW:  ‘Border Love’ features Border Patrol Agents assigned to Brownsville, Texas located on the Texas/Mexican Border. My husband and I spent several winters in Brownsville and I found many interesting things about it. A highway just outside town has a tall chainlink fence running parallel to the road for miles and miles. Just on the other side of the fence is the Rio Grande River. If your arms  were long enough, you could dip your hand into the water. The river is also shallow along here so the most that would get wet would be your pants legs. No buildings are visible on the Mexican side and ranches are along the road on the US side with no buildings in sight. It would be easy to wade across the river, use the spaces in the fence to climb and be in this country. The fence follows the contours of the river so many areas are out of sight. Also many Mexican students commute to Texas Southernmost University which is within walking distance of the bridge they walk across. You can pay a small toll and walk across into Mexico. With all of this in mind, I let my imagination run wild and thought of various problems that could arise from the close proximity and easy access to and from Mexico. I did extensive research which I do for all of my books. Then I decided what problems to give my agents. Drugs are a bigger problem in Mexico than they are here. Some towns are subjected to nightly battles between rival gangs over turf. A lot of the problems are caused by people from countries to the south of Mexico. I also had to consider that the drug smuggling trade wouldn’t get a foothold here if not for the involvement of US citizens. Unfortunately all of the situations I use in the book are possible.

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GER: You have conducted a number of writing workshops. What are the benefits of workshops to those attending and to you?

AW: I do several writing workshops for groups of interested people. The basic one deals with the three elements necessary to write a story: character, setting and plot. I go into detail about the three and explore various options. If time permits, I have those attending develop the beginning of a story that includes all three elements. I pose questions along the way. (I’m a retired teacher so I can’t help it.  What’s in it for me? I enjoy helping people follow their dreams.)

GER: What advice would you give to emerging writers and poets?

AW: I always tell writers and poets, if you have an idea, write it because it will continue to bug you until you do. You don’t have to worry about forgetting it. It’s not going anywhere until you write it. Remember, the hardest part is starting. 

alice 5GER: Your poetry and short stories range from realism to the surreal. Do you approach these genres differently than your romance novels and does it reflect another side of Alice Wootson?

AW:  I don’t know why my short stories and my poetry are not only different from my novels, but they are different from each other. I think my personality is split three ways. I might read something or see something and an idea pops into my head and I have to get it down.

GER: You are firmly grounded in family and faith. How does this stability assist you in your writing?

AW:   I am blessed in many ways and I am aware of it. I have choices. I do not have drama in my life and I am thankful for it. I live comfortably in a nice house on a quiet street in a quiet, safe neighborhood and I have everything I need. I am aware that too many people aren’t as blessed as I am. I write because I want to, not because I have to. (Although, if I have an idea it will make me write it so it will leave me alone.)

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GER: Some poets shy away from public readings of their work. You have performed your poetry at many venues. Tell us how the interaction with an audience has assisted you in the development of your poetry?

AW: I am still a little uncomfortable reading in public, but I like to think people enjoy hearing my poetry and find much of it thought-provoking. I get positive feedback from those who hear it and I am grateful for that.

GER: Who are your favorite writers and poets?

AW:  A few of my favorite poets are old: Langston Hughes, Paul Lawrence Dunbar, Gwendolyn Brooks, but I read whoever I have access to. I’m only going to name two authors: Beverly Jenkins and Catherine Coulter although I read many, many others. I’m on a romantic suspense kick right now and there’s a lot of authors out there.

GER: What is next for Alice Wootson?

AW: My next book released will probably be “Border Danger” because my editor already has it. “Border Danger” also features Border Partol agents stationed in Brownsville, but they are different agents facing different dangers. The two books aren’t part of a series, just wiith the same setting. I also have to get back to Nate, a secondary character from ‘Aloha Love” who tried to take over every scene he was in. He finally backed off when I promised him his own story. I started it and have to get back to it soon, but I’ve been working on submitting 4 other finished novels. I have to get back to Nate, though. I have a feeling he’s losing patience with me. I’m serious about this..

Alice Wootson at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Alice-Wootson/e/B001JRUHYM

You can read the poetry and fiction of Alice Wootson in The Fox Chase Review: http://www.foxchasereview.org/2008/22-AliceWootson.html http://www.foxchasereview.org/10WS/WootsonA.html http://www.foxchasereview.org/13WS/Wootson.html

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2nd-saturday-poets-1-21-12-guarnieri-reutter-readiing-017-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA) https://gereutter.wordpress.com/

Wittle and Lowenthal Bring Autumn to Ryerss

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Featured readers MM WIttle and Rodger Lowenthal welcomed Autumn to Ryerss with a colorful reading. The featured readers were followed by an open mic with Wendy Schermer, Maria Keane, Elizabeth Rivers and Alice Wootson.

Please view photographs of the event here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

Next up in Fox Chase: Bill Wunder and Robert Rosenbloom Oct. 26th

Remembering Maya Angelou – In the Words of Poets

Remembering Maya Angelou- Poets Diane Sahms-Guarnieri  Mel Brake
Lamont B. Steptoe and Alice Wootson

maya-angelou- courtesy official websiteMaya Angelou was born on April 4, 1928. She rose from humble beginnings having worked as fry cook, prostitute, night-club dancer and performer to become a premier writer, poet, actor, director, civil rights leader. She was honored with the Reynolds Professorship of American Studies at Wake Forrest University.  In 1993 she read her poem “On the Pulse of Morning”, at Bill Clinton’s inauguration. Angelou’s literary achievements inspired many poets as well as her faith in the promise of America.

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Maya Angelou Remembered in the Words of Poets
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maya-angelou-courtesy offical website 3.
When I Die I’ll Live Again 
 By Diane Sahms-Guarnieri
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Maya Angelou’s book, Poems, was one of the first books of poetry I bought from Barnes and Noble in Jenkintown, PA.  Reading through Angelou’s internal rhymes there was an obvious musical quality to her poems, as they appeared on page after page; however, it wasn’t until I played a CD (included in a poetry anthology that I purchased at a later date) of her reading “Phenomenal Woman,” that Angelou’s strong spirit came alive. It was not just the musicality of her words, but it was also the great confidence she exuded and the somewhat intimidating strength of her very own voice that drew me to her.  A truly phenomenal woman who was not afraid to celebrate being a woman: “’Cause I’m woman / Phenomenally. / Phenomenal woman, / That’s me.”
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 It wasn’t until today, upon her death, that I read that she was raped at seven by her mother’s boyfriend, who was beaten to death by a mob when she told on him. Overwhelmed by his death at the tender age of seven she was silent for almost six years.  Over time she allowed herself to develop her strong musical sounding voice, evident in the reading of several stanzas of “Still I rise.”
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                                                Did you want to see me broken?
                                                Bowed head and lowered eyes?
                                                Shoulders falling down like teardrops,
                                                Weakened by my soulful cries.” (Fourth stanza)
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As an African American woman, she led a long courageous life, befriending Malcom X, Martin Luther King Jr and his wife, Coretta Scott King, Oprah Winfrey and Rosa Parks among others.
A civil rights activist: “Out of the huts of history’s shame”
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                                                   I rise
                                                   Up from a past that’s rooted in pain
                                                   I rise
                                                   I’m a black ocean, leaping and wide.
                                                   Welling and swelling I bear in the tide. (Eighth stanza)
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She taught unity in brotherhood and sisterhood without racial, gender, or ethnic discrimination.
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                                                Leaving behind nights of terror and fear
                                                I rise
                                                Into daybreak that’s wondrously clear
                                                I rise
                                                Bringing the gifts that my ancestors gave,
                                                I am the dream and the hope of the slave
                                                I rise
                                                I rise
                                                I rise.  (Last stanza)
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She read “On the Pulse of Morning,” at William Clinton’s inauguration and has been blessed with numerous publications and honorable achievement awards, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, presented to her by Barack Obama.
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In addition to her many creative talents (writer, director, singer, dancer, actress), she will be most remembered for her courage as an African American woman in a day when speaking out and taking a stand for truth in our country was very dangerous.
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On my way home from work today, listening to NPRs tribute to her, she said that she was not afraid of dying, that death was just a continuation of life, so the last stanza of her poem, “Thank You, Lord “seems a fitting conclusion:
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                                                I was once a sinner man,
                                                Living unsaved and wild,
                                                Taking my chances in a dangerous world,
                                                Putting my soul on trial.
                                                Because of your mercy,
                                                Falling down on me like rain
                                                Because of your mercy,
                                                When I die I’ll live again,
                                                Let me humbly say,
                                                Thank you for this day.
                                                I want to thank You.
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Believing in the Promise of America
By Mel Brake
Maya Angelou, a great American, was an inspiration to me personally. From when I read her memoir “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” to her poem “On the Pulse of Morning”. Ms. Angelou inspired to me to believe in the promise that is America through her writing. That we are all one people under the sun with liberties and justice for all.
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From Lamont B. Steptoe
Dr. Maya Angelou was a luminous multi-talented activist and freedom fighter who used her God given gifts to raise the “advanced” among us to better and more conscious human beings. Her legacy is a beacon to assist us to transform our bleeding, toxic and polluted world into a more exalted one.
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From Alice Wootson
I love Maya Angelou’s prose and poetry, but I admire how she was able to overcome so much adversity and reach worldwide claim. She had the talent to put into poetry what we were feeling deep down inside. I will miss this gracious lady.
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Learn More about the poet here: http://mayaangelou.com/

Nemec Foster and Levin Up the Bar at Ryerss

IMG_9222Linda Nemec Foster and Lynn Levin took to the mic in the 2nd floor gallery of Ryerss following the annual Petapalooza Festival at the museum. The two poets presented an exemplary reading followed by an outstanding open mic with Rodger Lowenthal and Alice Wootson

You can view photographs of the reading at this link:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438