Tag Archives: ann e michael

Literary News and Blogs

newspaper-reporter-typewriter

Review – Erik Verhaar’s Andalusian Dogging

http://www.emptymirrorbooks.com/features/literature/review-erik-verhaar-andalusian-dogging.html

Top 40 Poetry Books of 2014 [40 – 31]

http://coldfrontmag.com/top-40-poetry-books-of-2014-40-31/

thad-2

Thaddeus Rutkowski at NYT Opinionator

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/author/thaddeus-rutkowski/?_r=2

Poe daguerreotype circa 1847

The American Literary Blog – Celebrating Poe

http://americanliteraryblog.blogspot.com/2010/01/birth-of-edgar-poe.html

AXJ

Interview with X.J and Dorothy Kennedy with Doug Holder

http://dougholder.blogspot.com/2015/01/interview-with-xj-and-dorothy-kennedy.html

The Unexpected Reversibility of Things

http://evidenceanecdotal.blogspot.com/2015/01/the-unexpected-reversibility-of-things.html

chandler

The World Of Raymond Chandler In His Own Words

http://www.pauldavisoncrime.com/2015/01/allen-barra-at-st.html

confessions

January in Japan: ‘Confessions’ by Kanae Minato, trans. Stephen Snyder

https://findingtimetowrite.wordpress.com/2015/01/19/january-in-japan-confessions-by-kanae-minato-trans-stephen-snyder/

tom michael 1962

The March to Montgomery, 1965

https://annemichael.wordpress.com/2015/01/18/guest-blogger-memoir/

louise

Louise Halvardsson Live

https://louisehalvardsson.wordpress.com/2015/01/15/arg-en-dikt-om-att-vara-arg-over-att-inte-kunna-bli-arg/

At This Time of the Turning of the Year – essay

http://jessandunnotis-writer.com/2015/01/01/at-this-time-of-the-turning-of-the-year-essay/

Resurrections, Do-Overs, And Second Lives: A 2015 Poetry Preview

http://www.npr.org/2015/01/17/377189644/resurrections-do-overs-and-second-lives-a-2015-poetry-preview

Spring preview 2015: short fiction & poetry

http://www.quillandquire.com/preview/2015/01/15/spring-preview-2015-short-fiction-poetry/

An Excellent End to Natl. Poetry Month in Fox Chase

Featured Poets Dan Maguire and Ann E. Michael

Featured Poets Dan Maguire and Ann E. Michael

The calming influence of Dan Maguire and Ann E. Michael overcame the 2nd floor gallery of Ryerss Museum and Library, an excellent poetry reading. The features were followed by an outstanding open mic with: David Kozinski, Michele Belloumini, Lynette Esposito, Marcia Carsello.

Photographs can be viewed here:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

Coming up next:

Poets @ Pennypack II – May 10th:  https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2014/04/21/poets-pennypack-ii-may-10th/

Michael and Maguire in Fox Chase- April 27th

michaelDMaguireThe Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present our Featured Poets/Writers Reading on April 27th with Poets Ann E. Michael and Dan Maguire at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111.  The reading will begin @ 2pm in the second floor gallery of the museum. The features will be followed by an open reading.

For more information please view these links: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/michael-and-maguire-april-27th/ Broadsides by Michael and Maquire will be available at the reading: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2014/04/05/fcr-broadsides-14-6-and-14-7-available-april-27th/

Michael and Maguire April 27th

The Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present our Featured Poets/Writers Reading on April 27th with Poets Ann E. Michael and Dan Maguire at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Host: Rodger Lowenthal.  The reading will begin @ 2pm in the second floor gallery of the museum. The features will be followed by an open reading

michael

Poet, essayist, librettist, and educator Ann E. Michael is Writing Coordinator at DeSales University. Her work has been published in many journals, including Poem, Natural Bridge, Ninth Letter, Runes, Diner, Sentence, Slant, ISLE, The Writer’s Chronicle, Schuylkill Valley Journal of the Arts and others, as well as in numerous literary anthologies. She is a past recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her chapbooks include More than Shelter, The Minor Fauna, Small Things Rise & Go, and The Capable Heart. Her full-length collection, Water-Rites, is now available from Brick Road Poetry Press. You can read the poetry of Ann E. Michael in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/Michael.html

DMaguire

Dan Maguire’s poetry has won prizes and awards and has appeared in numerous anthologies and reviews. He has been nominated for three Pushcart Prizes. Poets Robert Bly and Gerald Stern have favorably reviewed his work. His latest release titled Finding The Words is available from Plan B Press. You can read the poetry of Dan Maguire in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/09AW/17-DMaguire.html

….. We’ll Be Back in January

FCRMasthead2011-RGB-for PRINT docs

We are looking forward to a great 2014 here in Fox Chase.

The Winter/Spring 2014 Edition of The Fox Chase Review is slated for release in January. Until then you can enjoy the review at www.foxchasereview.org

We will resume blogging in January 2014.

ryerss

Our Featured Poet/Writer Series at Ryerss Museum and Library kicks off on January 26th with Maryann L. Miller and J. Erin Sweeney. Our full lineup for 2014 can be viewed here: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/docs/FCR2014ReadingSchedule.pdf

Amp at Pennypack Environmental Center

Our new outdoor poetry series, Poets @ Pennypack will be held on April 12th and May 10th. Our lineup can be viewed at these links:

April 12th: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/docs/FoxChaseReadingSeries-414.pdf

May 10th: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/docs/FoxChaseReadingSeries514.pdf

Scenes from Poets on the Porch 2013 045

Poets on the Porch at Ryerss Museum and Library will be held on July 13th. Our lineup can be viewed at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/docs/PoetsonthePorch_2014.pdf

The Autumn/Winter 2013 Edition of The Fox Chase Review is now on line

Splash.

.

.

.

.

.

The Autumn/Winter 2013 edition of The Fox Chase Review, our 16th, is now live and on line. http://www.foxchasereview.org/Welcome.html

In this edition we are pleased to present:

Poetry by: Michael Adams, J.J. Campbell, John Dorsey, Lynn Esposito, Linda Nemec Foster, Maria Keane,  Jane Rosenberg LaForge,  Adrian Manning, Bernadette McBride, Ann E Michael, Sonnet Mondal, Robert Rosenbloom, Wendy Schermer, Lisa Sewell, Michael Steffen, F Omar Telan, Lynne Thompson and Dave Worrell

We hope you enjoy this edition of the review.

The Editors

http://www.foxchasereview.org/Welcome.html

Issue #16 Coming to a Computer Near You Soon

FCRMasthead2011-RGB-for PRINT docs

Issue #16 of The Fox Chase Review will be released on line soon. This Edition features the poetry of:

Poetry by: Michael Adams, J.J. Campbell, John Dorsey, Lynn Esposito, Linda Nemec Foster, Maria Keane,  Jane Rosenberg LaForge,  Adrian Manning, Bernadette McBride, Ann E Michael, Sonnet Mondal, Robert Rosenbloom, Wendy Schermer, Lisa Sewell, Michael Steffen, F Omar Telan, Lynne Thompson and Dave Worrell 

What I Can Tell You By Ruth Moon Kempher

what can i

Bright Hill Press, 2013
Paperback, 82 pp. $16
ISBN 978-1-892471-72-7
.
Reviewed by Ann E. Michael
.
Ruth Moon Kempher has been publisher of Kings Estate Press since 1994 and, in that capacity as well as on her own, has long explored the overlap and connectedness of art forms such as poetry, jazz, and painting. Many Kings Estate Press anthologies revolve around such themes, and Ms. Moon Kempher demonstrates a deft touch as editor. In her recent solo collection from Bright Hill Press, the poet has the opportunity to structure her own work, and her approach reflects her anthology experience. She groups her poems into seven subtitled sections that are thematic and quirky.
.
Quirky poems, too, sometimes; and I mean that in the best sense. Kempher’s work never shies from humor, the twisted meaning; she embraces wordplay, seeks a bit of the contrary to tweak her reader out of complacency. While not all of her poems are curious and quizzical—the title piece, for instance, is a tiny heartbreaker with only a hint of self-deprecation—this collection aims to entertain with surprises in topic, image, and narrative and benefits from rollicking rhythms and clever insights that link each poem with the next.
An example of Kempher’s adeptness with puns, sound, and image:
.
“Object of Affliction: The Thistle
                     is, speaking in tongues
a lisp of nasty business, having been
picked here, for its ill nature
or rather, once
having been plucked
into one’s pocket, it’s a ticklish
situation…”
.
These thistles “stick around” (of course!) and are “too ephemeral to persevere/forever, too multiple/to stop.” Significant wisdom in those last three lines, proof also of Kempher’s facility with wonderfully observant phrasing. Her use of language can be metaphorical but also simply descriptive and clear. She writes, “a barber buzzed a bent neckline,” “Wisteria wrenched/arthritic knuckles on the sill, the sun-gold stucco…” and “A spun trap for the eye. Very quiet. No music.” In “The Hybridizer Crows,” which sports an epigraph from Finnegan’s Wake, she produces a James Joyce-Wallace Stevens mashup through a Gertrude Stein-like set of stanzas that are fun to read aloud.
.
Ruth Moon Kempher seems most comfortable writing poems that exude the gorgeous weirdness of coastal Florida, with its mix of abundant flora, eccentric human denizens, sea, sand, boutiques and coffee shops all offering moments of the unexpected. Weather included; when hurricane season looms, she notes “Pointer tips on isobars/coiled like fallen phonelines, expectant/county by county, urgent patterns/in paisley loops of leaf and rain…” If you want a taste of Saint Augustine, the collection provides. Kempher has lived there for decades, and this experience also colors her poetry—the issue of whether age ever develops into wisdom (“Of Keys, And Time” is a wonderful example”). She does look back with a wry gaze, but most of her work celebrates the current moment and indeed the very work itself, as in “Northeast Winds: Of Separation” in which the speaker admits
.
“Some days, though
it’s not so easy, writing. The work takes you
back into sea skuzz, old manuscript dust…”
.
We can be glad that Ruth Moon Kempher prevails against the sea skuzz and the difficulties of remembering, sorting, observing, and writing. She is correct when she says “Walls of words and silences need those quirked openers those corkscrewed expressions.” Indeed, they open up unusual and entertaining worlds.
.
.
.
ann-e-michael-photo-by-david-sloanPoet, essayist, librettist, and educator Ann E. Michael is Writing Coordinator at DeSales University. Her work has been published in many journals, including Poem, Natural Bridge, Ninth Letter, RunesDiner, Sentence, Slant, ISLE, The Writer’s Chronicle, Schuylkill Valley Journal of the Arts and others, as well as in numerous literary anthologies. She is a past recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her chapbooks include More than Shelter, The Minor Fauna, Small Things Rise & Go, and The Capable Heart. Her full-length collection, Water-Rites, is now available from Brick Road Poetry Press.

Swimming the Eel Poems by Zara Raab

raab-coverPaperback: 116 pages
Publisher: David Robert Books (2011)
Price: $20.00
ISBN-13: 978-1-936370-44-3
.
Review by: Ann E. Michael
.
There are many ways to narrate a history, and poetry is one of the traditional methods of passing along a culture, a way of life, a sense of “who we are.” Often, these narratives are intimate, meant to convey to the listeners a kind of tribal awareness: this story is what makes you (us) special. In such cases, the writer needs to be aware that the reader may not be “us,” may need an area of grounding in order to engage with and relate to the poems; without some measure of accessibility, the narrative might falter. Navigating this territory—between the intimate, familial “us” and the universal “we”—is something Zara Raab manages well in her collection Swimming the Eel. While the poems cumulatively tell the story of a region and a family or interconnected set of families, the book as a whole follows a trajectory Americans understand; and reflective citizens will recognize in these poems a history of the tribal, geological, environmental and cultural streams that have lent their elements to the people we are today.
These poems are rooted, almost literally, in northern California; and the majority of the pieces are subtly wrought with an eye to meter, rhythmic and rhyme patterns. Readers who are unfamiliar with the region will find that Raab immerses them in its images, flora, fauna, and its geological and cultural spaces. Early in the collection, we meet Tom Buhe, fishing for salmon in the land of the Wiyot people. One of the elders calls to him,
.
In his hip boots, Tom went to him
through fescue grasses high as his shins,
shouldering his creel,
two men standing where Eel fell to sea,
the Wiyot at home in their tipis,
Tom with his lines and reel.
.
Raab’s lines quickly establish the sort of landscape these people inhabit, its grasses and its swamps, winter wheatfields, laurel and “springy, pungent pine boughs,” whiskey stills, stinkweed. And, too, she resurrects the natives who once populated the area of Mendocino and northward, as well as the interloping whites who came for trapping, gold, farming, fish. In these poems, we encounter the Wiyot, the Yahi, Athapaskans, Pomos, Sinkyone and Wailaki, peoples unfamiliar to most people who now call themselves Americans. The original peoples’ territory begins, in this narrative, in Illinois with the opening poem. By the closing section of the book, in contemporary Mendocino and San Francisco, all that are left of these people are the names of rivers and mountains, a few towns.
Swimming the Eel introduces some recurring characters and their descendants and namesakes: the Alonzos, Hands, Nells and Belles who travel or stay put, staking various kinds of claims upon the land.Raab employs persona to create this multi-layered regional collage, as in “Gravel-man” and “You Never Know;” other times, the first person pronoun conveys the impression that the readers are encountering the poet’spersona. Raab’s use of the word “we” is intriguing—there is the familial “we” of siblings as well as the unifying collective of “we the people;” or in more intimate uses (you, auditor, are privy to what I, speaker, reveal). Sometimes this “we” suggests an ethnicity or cultural community, sometimes a romance, “humming the morning aria /we shared, the barber’s son and I.”
Because Raab’s poems follow people on journeys both physical and emotional, the collection draws the reader in on several levels. In “Going to Branscomb,” a woman has “set out alone in March; winter had filled/the pools over the old flows of lava” and travels alone to find a place to settle: “she forded the Eel/at Branscomb, hoe rattling in the wagon,/and claimed her land at last.” In “The Father,” the poet writes: “Brothers go far from home; sisters endure very different/fates; strangers come among us, whom we take as our/own. Constantly we struggle to make a living…” This struggle lies at the heart of Swimming the Eel and is explicitly examined, human being by human being, within the landscapes these travelers pass through, try to tame, and live in with awareness that seems almost archaic in its sensuous attention to detail. If we are very quiet, and careful, we may encounter many revelations amid the russian olives, orcuttia grasses, hair sedge, poppies, and along the banks of rivers.
And if we are ourselves careful readers, we will find that Raab knows well how to employ formal strategies in her poems, metrical subtleties that do not overweigh the lines and that do what metrics ought to do—enhance the meaning—and is capable of great refinement of sound in her use of assonance and rhyme. She sustains the reader through sound, rhythm, character, narrative, and vivid observation in this chronology of ancestry and change.
You can get the book at this link:  http://www.davidrobertbooks.com/raab.html
.

ann-e-michael-photo-by-david-sloanPoet, essayist, librettist, and educator Ann E. Michael is Writing Coordinator at DeSales University. Her work has been published in many journals, including Poem, Natural Bridge, Ninth Letter, RunesDiner, Sentence, Slant, ISLE, The Writer’s Chronicle, Schuylkill Valley Journal of the Arts and others, as well as in numerous literary anthologies. She is a past recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her chapbooks include More than Shelter, The Minor Fauna, Small Things Rise & Go, and The Capable Heart. Her full-length collection, Water-Rites, is now available from Brick Road Poetry Press.

This Bed Our Bodies Shaped – Poems by April Lindner

Paperback: 81 pages

Publisher: Able Muse Press (2012)

Price:$17.95 ($9.95 e-book)

ISBN-13: 978-0-9878705-9-9

Reviewed by Ann E. Michael

The female body appears often in art and poetry as subject, image, and metaphor; yet in her book This Bed Our Bodies Shaped, April Lindner reminds us that each woman’s body is inhabited by a human being with a unique perspective and set of experiences. Often, a viewpoint shift occurs within these short, lyrical poems as it occurs within the woman’s consciousness: an artist’s model who hardly recognizes herself in the students’ sketches, a young woman whose red dress and high heels garner attention from men she hadn’t wanted to attract. Lindner traces a constellation of events here—childhood quarrels, divorce, birth, adolescent sexual awakenings in boys and girls—the “stuff” of a contemporary life in the United States. Her scope extends further, however. The body, particularly the woman’s body, anchors poems of place, evokes both Frida Kahlo and St. Theresa. In “She,” a suicide bomber straps explosives under her breasts, willing to shatter her wholeness for a purpose the poem’s speaker both wants to learn and wants to stop. The use of the sonnet form, with its “constraints,” for this searching poem demonstrates that Lindner can construct the perfect poetic frame for the poem’s subject content.

Over and over, Lindner’s work features solid understanding of formal strategies and the aesthetic appeal of musicality in poems. In addition to sonnets, a villanelle, rhymed couplet stanzas, and the rhythm of metered lines underscore her attentive descriptions of a recognizable quirky world. Her imaginative approach is incisive, vivid, and sometimes funny, as in the poem “Waiting,” set in a doctor’s main office. The poem captures the speculative mood and restlessness of a creative mind forced to idle. Lindner appreciates the dark humor of irony, and employs it well. A riff on memento mori states, “The skeleton’s a drone/and best ignored;’” in “Our Lady of Perpetual Help,” the sooty ruin of a burned-out church is “a dead incisor in a weary smile.” The poem “Red Dress” turns the speaker into an only slightly less naïve Red Riding Hood; a rebellious pre-teen boy who momentarily returns to the little kid who says he loves his mom “now sounds like an appeal/for future misdemeanors.” That’s a truthful irony, and an honest admission of something many weary parents feel.

If you  happen to be a middle-class, middle-aged woman, you will relate to the subjects in April Lindner’s collection; but do not dismiss it if you don’t fit this demographic. All serious readers of poetry will see This Bed Our Bodies Shaped as a stellar example of how good poetry succeeds on many levels. Rich imagery and startling but appropriate use of language—Lindner is masterful at subtle and effective alliteration—make these poems a pleasure to read. The cultural connotations and metaphors elicited by the body are academically interesting, but Lindner’s work focuses on what readers most understand: human relationships to one another, to the physical world, to the bodies we use as we share with one another intimately. Through these poems, she also addresses our desire to stay in the world and, while we can, in our flesh.

The Poetry of April Lindner in The Fox Chase Review2010 AW

.

.

Poet, essayist, librettist, and educator Ann E. Michael is Writing Coordinator at DeSales University. Her work has been published in many journals, including Poem, Natural Bridge, Ninth Letter, RunesDiner, Sentence, Slant, ISLE, The Writer’s Chronicle, Schuylkill Valley Journal of the Arts and others, as well as in numerous literary anthologies. She is a past recipient of a Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Fellowship in Poetry. Her chapbooks include More than Shelter, The Minor Fauna, Small Things Rise & Go, and The Capable Heart. Her full-length collection, Water-Rites, is now available from Brick Road Poetry Press.