Tag Archives: Christine Klocek-Lim

Hinton and Klocek-Lim Read for National Poetry Month at Ryerss

Featured Poets Le Hinton and Christine Klocek-Lim

Featured Poets Le Hinton and Christine Klocek-Lim

The Fox Chase Reading Series was pleased to present the poetry of Christine Klocek-Lim and Le Hinton at our Featured Readers Series. The featured readings were wonderful followed by an outstanding open mic with Lester Mobley, Michelle Belluomini, O.P. Fredericks, Erin Sweeney, Omar Telan, Lyn Esposito, Elizabeth Bodien and Diane Sahms-Guarnieri.

Thanks to our Featured Poets and a great open mic line-up for a fine end to National Poetry Month in Fox Chase. To see more photographs please visit:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

Klocek-Lim and Hinton on April 28th

ChristineKlocek-LimLeHinton

The Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present our Featured Poets/Writers Reading on April 28th with Poets Christine Klocek-Lim and Le Hinton at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. The reading will begin @ 2pm in the second floor gallery of the museum. The featured poets will be followed by an open reading.

For bios and more please visit: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2013/04/02/april-28th-christine-kloek-lim-and-le-hinton-in-fox-chase/

April 28th – Christine Klocek-Lim and Le Hinton in Fox Chase

The Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present our Featured Poets/Writers Reading on April 28th with Poets Christine Klocek-Lim and Le Hinton at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. The reading will begin @ 2pm in the second floor gallery of the museum. The featured poets will be followed by an open reading.

Christine Klocek-Lim received the 2009 Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in poetry. She has four chapbooks: Ballroom – a love story (Flutter Press), Cloud Studies (Whale Sound Audio Chapbooks), How to photograph the heart (The Lives You Touch Publications), and The book of small treasures (Seven Kitchens Press). Her poems have appeared in Nimrod, OCHO, Diode, Riffing on Strings: Creative Writing Inspired by String Theory and elsewhere. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net anthologies and was a finalist for 3 Quarks Daily’s Prize in Arts & Literature. She is editor of Autumn Sky Poetry. You can read the poetry of Christine Klocek-Lim in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/ChristineKlocek-Lim.html and an interview with Christine Klocek-Lim at this link: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2012/06/01/10-questions-for-christine-klocek-lim/

Le Hinton is the author of four collections of poetry including, most recently, Black on Most Days (Iris G. Press, 2008) and The God of Our Dreams (Iris G. Press, 2010). His work has been published in various journals including Gargoyle, haggard and halloo, Literary Chaosand Bent Pin Quarterly. His poem, “Our Ballpark,” will be part of the Poetry Paths installation at Clipper Magazine Stadium in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 2012. He is the founder and chief editor of the poetry journal Fledgling Rag. You can read the poetry of Le Hinton in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/LeHinton.html and an interview with Le Hinton at this link: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2013/02/16/10-questions-for-le-hinton/

2013 Fox Chase Reading Series – January to June

The Fox Chase Reading Series is pleased to present poets/writers reading for the first half of the season in 2013 for our Featured Poets/Writers series at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. The readings will begin @ 2pm in the second floor gallery of the museum. The featured poets/writers will be followed by an open reading.

January 27th @ 2pm – Lester Mobley and Bruce Kramer 

Lester Mobley has been a proud “blue collar” construction worker for over 30 years. A native of New York, he has lived in Philadelphia for most of his life. He draws inspiration for his writing from a passion for jazz, jazz culture, justice, nature and appreciation of human spirituality and God. He can be found reading his poetry at open mics in the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania area. His latest release Jazz Musings and Similar Poems will be available at the event.  You can read his poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link:http://www.foxchasereview.org/11AW/LMobley.html

Bruce Kramer is a writer from Philadelphia. Most of his work has appeared in boring technical documents, medical publications, and marketing propaganda, but he has also been published in the occasional magazine and literary publication. He believes in cold beer, rock and roll, and baseball. He sometimes acts like he is named after Bruce Springsteen, but he knows he is named after somebody much cooler. You can read his poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/BruceKramer.html

February 24th @ 2pm – James Arthur and Grant Clauser 

James Arthur’s first book, Charms against Lightning, was releasedby Copper Canyon Press. Individual poems in the volume have appear or will soon appear in The New Yorker, The New Republic, Poetry, Ploughshares, The Southern Review, The American Poetry Review, New England Review, and Narrative. James Arthur has received the Amy Lowell Travelling Poetry Scholarship, a Wallace Stegner Fellowship, a Discovery/The Nation Prize, and a residency at the Amy Clampiit House, as well as fellowships at Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. Beginning in September, he will be a Hodder Fellow at the Lewis Center for the Arts in Princeton. You can read the poetry of James Arthur in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/JamesArthur.html

Grant Clauser lives in Montgomery County and make his living as a home technology writer. His poems have appeared in The Literary ReviewPainted Bride QuarterlyCortland ReviewWisconsin ReviewBlueline and others. In 2010 he was named the Montgomery County Poet Laureate by Robert Bly. His book The Trouble with Rivers (Foothills Publishing) was published in 2012. He runs the Montco Wordshop, teach poetry writing at Philadelphia’s Musehouse and blog at poetcore.com. You can read the poetry of Grant Clauser in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/GrantClauser.html

March 24th @ 2pm – Frank Wilson and John Timpane 

Frank Wilson has been reviewing books professionally since October 1964. For most of the past decade he was Books Editor at the Philadelphia Inquirer. He currently blogs at Books Inq. It is one of the most successful blogs in the literary blogosphere. You can read the poetry of Frank Wilson in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/FrankWilson.html

John Timpane is Media Editor/Writer and Assistant Books Editor of the Philadelphia Inquirer. His poetry has appeared in Sequoia, Vocabula Review, Apiary, ONandOnScreen, Painted Bride Quarterly, Per Contra, 5_Trope, Wild River Review, and elsewhere. His books include (with Nancy H. Packer) Writing Worth Reading (NY: St. Martin, 1994); It Could Be Verse (Berkeley, Calif.: Ten Speed, 1995); (with Maureen Watts and the Poetry Center of San Francisco State University) Poetry for Dummies (NY: Hungry Minds, 2000); and (with Roland Reisley)Usonia, N.Y.: Building a Community with Frank Lloyd Wright (NY: Princeton Architectural Press, 2000); and a book of poetry, Burning Bush (Ontario, Canada: Judith Fitzgerald/Cranberry Tree, 2010). He lives in Lawrenceville, N.J., and is husband to Maria-Christina Keller, copy director at Scientific American. They are amazed parents of Pilar and Conor. The poetry of John Timpane will appear in the Winter/Spring 2013 edition of The Fox Chase Review.

April 28th @ 2pm – Christine Klocek-Lim and Le Hinton

Christine Klocek-Lim received the 2009 Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in poetry. She has four chapbooks: Ballroom – a love story (Flutter Press), Cloud Studies (Whale Sound Audio Chapbooks), How to photograph the heart (The Lives You Touch Publications), and The book of small treasures (Seven Kitchens Press). Her poems have appeared in Nimrod, OCHO, Diode, Riffing on Strings: Creative Writing Inspired by String Theory and elsewhere. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net anthologies and was a finalist for 3 Quarks Daily’s Prize in Arts & Literature. She is editor of Autumn Sky Poetry. You can read the poetry of Christine Klocek-Lim in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/ChristineKlocek-Lim.html

Le Hinton is the author of four collections of poetry including, most recently, Black on Most Days (Iris G. Press, 2008) and The God of Our Dreams (Iris G. Press, 2010). His work has been published in various journals including Gargoyle, haggard and halloo, Literary Chaosand Bent Pin Quarterly. His poem, “Our Ballpark,” will be part of the Poetry Paths installation at Clipper Magazine Stadium in Lancaster, Pennsylvania in 2012. He is the founder and chief editor of the poetry journal Fledgling Rag. You can read the poetry of Le Hinton in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12SU/LeHinton.html

May 19th @ 2pm – Leslie Anne Mcilroy and Rosebud Ben-Oni

Leslie Anne Mcilroy won the 2001 Word Press Poetry Prize for her full-length collectionRare Space and the 1997 Slipstream Poetry Chapbook Prize for her chapbook Gravel. She also took first place in the1997 Chicago Literary Awards Competition judged by Gerald Stern. Her second full-length book, Liquid Like This, was published by Word Press in 2008. Leslie’s work appears in numerous publications including American Poetry: The Next GenerationDogwoodThe Emily Dickinson Award AnthologyThe LedgeThe Mississippi Review, and the Nimrod International Journal of Prose & Poetry and Pearl. Leslie works as a copywriter in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, where she lives with her daughter Silas, and writer/guitarist, Don Bertschman, with whom she also performs poetry. You can read the poetry of Leslie Anne Mcilroy in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12WS/LeslieAnneMcilroy.html

Rosebud Ben-Oni

A former Rackham Merit Scholar and Leopold Schepp Scholar, Rosebud Ben-Oni is a playwright at New Perspectives Theater, and at work on a new play. Her work appears in Arts & Letters, B O D Y, Borderlands: Texas Poetry Review and Puerto del Sol. Her first book of poems SOLECISM is forthcoming from Virtual Artists’ Collective in 2013. She’s co-editor of HER KIND, the official blog of VIDA: Women in Literary Arts. Find out more about her at 7TrainLove.org. The poetry of Rosebud Ben-Oni is forthcoming in the Winter/Spring 2013 Edition of The Fox Chase Review

June 30th @ 2pm –  F. Omar Telan and Richard Okewole

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Born in Philadelphia and raised in its outlying suburbs, F. Omar Telan graduated Emerson College and the Radcliffe Publishing Course. He made his directorial debut at La Mama E.T.C. (NYC) with THE EDGE OF THE WORLD. He has performed theatrically at P.S. 122 (NYC), the New York Fringe Festival, and the Philadelphia Fringe Festival. His poetry has been published in journals such as A GATHERING OF THE TRIBES and OUR OWN VOICE; and he has read his work at the Poetry Project at St. Mark’s Church (NYC), the Kelly Writers House (Philadelphia), the National Asian American Poetry Festival (NYC), the Philippine Embassy (DC), and the Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival (Waterloo Village, NJ). As a member of the New York Neo-Futurists, he shared a New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Performance Art Production for TOO MUCH LIGHT MAKES THE BABY GO BLIND.

A teacher by trade and writer at heart, Richard Okewole fuses his life in his native home of Nigeria with his experiences in the states to create poetry that speaks on many different levels. With an African father and Jamaican mother, Richard touches on topics in his writing that force readers to think outside the conventional box. His set of unpublished poetry have been featured in Polyphony Magazine and Anthology Philly Volume 1, but he spends most of his time teaching fourth grade in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he resides. You can read the poetry of Richard Okewole in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12WS/RichardOkewole.html

The Fox Chase Reading Series is hosted by:

g emil reutter 

http://gemilreutter-author.com

http://gereutter.wordpress.com/

Diane Sahms-Guarnieri 

http://www.dianesahms-guarnieri.com/

http://dianesahmsguarnieri.wordpress.com/

The second half of our season begins in September and ends in November. We will post information on those readings in July. Ryerss Museum and Library stands atop the hill at Burholme Park and is located close to the SEPTA Fox Chase Station and Ryers Station as well as the SEPTA 18 and 24 bus lines. If you arrive early, Ryerss offers free tours of the museum.   

2012 Year in Review

2012 was a good year here in Fox Chase. We published three editions of The Fox Chase Review publishing 43 poets and 9 prose writers. We continued to strive to offer diverse selections of poetry and prose to our readers. We encourage you to read the works of these artists at these links:  

Our 2012 Editions of The Fox Chase Review


.and visit: Comprehensive List of Contributors for our archives.

The Fox Chase Reading Series  partnered with Ryerss Museum and Library in Fox Chase to present eight events featuring 16 Poets in the second floor gallery of the museum.       

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Our Poetry Editor Diane Sahms-Guarnieri conducted 2 workshops in 2012. The Tenth Muse Poetry Workshop for the Delaware Literary Connection in April and for The Fox Chase Reading Series at The Hop Angel in November.

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The Fox Chase Review and Reading Series Blog promotes our readings, poets, writers,  interviews, book reviews and general information of interest for our readers and the Fox Chase community.

We are looking forward to 2013 with nine events featuring eighteen poets/writers reading for The Fox Chase Reading Series at Ryerss Museum and Library.  For dates and times please see our schedule at: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/docs/ReadingSeries2013.pdf . In January we will release of the Winter/Spring 2013 edition of The Fox Chase Review and are pleased to announce Poets on the Porch returns with 17 poets reading on the porch of Ryerss Museum and Library on July 13th.

The review and reading series are made possible by

Diane Sahms-Guarnieri 3

Poetry Editor Diane Sahms-Guarnieri

SR Moser
Fiction/Web Editor S.R. Moser

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Fiction Editor T.G. Davidson

Rodger Lowenthal reading 3-27-11

Occasional Book Reviewer and Host Rodger Lowenthal

In addition to contributors of book reviews and the poets and writers who grace our review with their work and read at our series. We do this for our love of the art of the written word and look forward to 2013 and your continued support.

g emil reutter

– g emil reutter

Our 2013 Reading Schedule

We are pleased to release our reading schedule for 2013. Nine events will be held at Ryerss Museum and Library featuring eighteen poets/writers. You can view our schedule at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/docs/ReadingSeries2013.pdf more detailed information will be posted here on the blog as each event nears.

10 Questions for Christine Klocek-Lim

     An interview with g emil reutter

Christine Klocek-Lim received the 2009 Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in poetry. She has four chapbooks: Ballroom – a love story (Flutter Press), Cloud Studies (Whale Sound Audio Chapbooks), How to photograph the heart (The Lives You Touch Publications), and The book of small treasures (Seven Kitchens Press). Her poems have appeared in Nimrod, OCHO, Diode, Riffing on Strings: Creative Writing Inspired by String Theory and elsewhere. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and Best of the Net anthologies and was a finalist for 3 Quarks Daily’s Prize in Arts & Literature. She is editor of Autumn Sky Poetry and her website is http://www.novembersky.com

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The Interview

GER: How would you describe your poetry and how long have you been crafting your work?

CKL: Describe my poetry? That’s an impossible question for a poet! Whenever I try to think of a pithy description, I stumble over what I’m trying to achieve with my words instead of what I’ve actually written. Every poem I create is a collection of imagery, emotion, and potential. I know what I want to do, but I’m never certain if I’ve achieved it. I aim for a kind of sensible surrealism weaved into a voice that speaks an emotional truth. How’s that for a non-answer?

I tend to try different things with my poetry. I’ve written free verse and sonnets, narrative poems and prose poems. I’ve switched up points-of-view. I’ve written collections about astronomy, ballroom dancing, parenthood, and supernatural visions. I have no idea how to quantify what I write, except to emphasize that I’m always exploring.

There is one concept to which I hold fast: it’s important to me to craft poetry that engages a reader either intellectually, emotionally, or pragmatically. I want my poems to make sense.

How long have I been writing? I began as a child, majored in writing in college (CMU), but I truly began the difficult work of intentional crafting fourteen years or so ago. In 1999 I joined an online workshop and realized very quickly how little I knew. By 2005, I could manage a poem that I wasn’t embarrassed to show someone maybe five percent of the time. By 2008 I’d managed to write poems that worked like I’d intended perhaps half the time.

GER: What poets have influenced you?

CKL: Oh, so many! Too many to name here, although there are a few that I still read over and over again: William Carlos Williams (when I first began writing poems in high school), Erica Jong, Carolyn Forché, and Jack Gilbert among others. I don’t ever put away Jack Gilbert’s poetry. It’s usually out on my desk.

I can’t talk about poets without mentioning individual poems. I have a bulletin board in my office that covers an entire wall and it’s completely filled with poems—I periodically take some down and replace them with new ones. However there are a select few I never remove: Musée des Beaux Arts by W.H. Auden, i carry your heart with me by E.E. Cummings, For the Stranger by Carolyn Forché, and two poems by Stephen Bunch: Arriving and Dying. I’d paste poems by Jack Gilbert up but there are too many favorites from which I’d have to choose.

GER: Your collection The Quantum Archives was a semi-finalist with Black Lawrence Press Black River Chapbook competition and you won the Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize in Poetry in 2009, for your collection, Dark Matter.  Were you surprised and how do you feel about poetry competitions?

CKL: I was very surprised. I thought for certain I’d be adding a new slip of paper to my shrine of rejections.  I’ve sent my Dark Matter manuscript into thirty-four competitions and it has made it to the finals or semi-finals eight times. The ten poems from it that won the Ellen La Forge Memorial Prize were published, but as a full-length collection it’s still hasn’t found a home. I’ve sent poems and other manuscripts to over forty other contests.

If you’re trying to make a name for yourself I think contests can be very helpful. If you’re trying to grow in your craft and explore the world as an artist they’re less than useful. It’s very easy to get caught up in the cycle of publish-or-perish and let contests convince you that they are the final arbiters of what constitutes good poetry. Contests are terribly subjective. Contests are also terribly addictive.

GER: You have written three additional collections. The book of small treasures (Seven Kitchens Press), Cloud Studies: a sonnet sequence (Whale Sound Audio Chapbooks), and of course, Ballroom – a love story (Flutter Press). Please describe your inspirations and how do the collections differ?

CKL:  My first collection was How to photograph the heart (The Lives You Touch Publications). I’ve also written a collection of prose poems titled Glimpse (unpublished) and a new collection of poems that is a sequel to The Quantum Archives. I’ve written a series of haikus about bicycling (also unpublished). As you can see, I don’t lack for inspiration.

There is a secret I learned sometime in the last few years regarding the muse, the zone, the flow, inspiration, whatever you want to call it: it doesn’t exist. Sure, sometimes I get the urge to write and I find myself jotting things down, but more often I sit and just begin typing. I take ideas that interest me and expand on them via poetry: astronomy, science, trauma, dance, meter, rhyme, surrealism, etc.

The book of small treasures was written from my experiences as a parent. I know it’s cliché. I know a thousand other poets have written about their kids, but I don’t care. Becoming a mother was one of the most insane things I’ve ever done. Even now, with my sons in their teens, it still feels like I’ve jumped out of a plane. Will the parachute work? Will I plummet to the ground? No one knows: not me, not my kids.

I wrote Cloud Studies: a sonnet sequence because I wanted to learn how to write sonnets. The only way to learn something is through practice. Artists often do a hundred or more “studies” of a particular thing when they’re learning how to draw. I did that with the sonnet form. I focused on clouds and weather and tried to connect it to some sort of emotional foundation so that the poems would resonate with a reader. I love those poems. I love that the editor, Nic Sebastian, recorded each poem. She’s an incredible reader.

Ballroom — a love story was written last year during April’s National Poetry Month. Actually, most of my collections were written each April during National Poetry Writing Month (NaPoWriMo). The goal is to write a poem each day. Because my husband and I had been dancing together for a few years, I felt as though I knew enough about ballroom dance to describe what it was like to take those first steps until you learn how to move properly. It’s also a book about love: what it’s like to fall into it and keep falling, over and over.

GER: Many poets believe live readings of their work enhance their ability to create and edit work. Do you enjoy reading to an audience and what benefits is there to live readings?

CKL: Um, no. I don’t like reading to an audience. I kind of hate it, actually, though I force myself to keep trying. I generally do one reading per year, just to prove I can.

I think people who are naturally extroverted or interested in drama are excellent readers. I’ve heard some wonderful poets read their poems: Carolyn Forché, Heather McHugh, James Wright to name a few. I’ve also heard some truly awful readings by wonderful poets. There’s a particular sort of sing-song cadence that a lot of poets fall into that sets my teeth on edge. When I do a reading, I practice with the poems I’d like to read by recording myself and listening to the quality of my vocal expression. I want to be sure that I’m not speaking in a monotone or emphasizing the wrong syllables. I want the reading to be a dynamic oral interpretation of the poem, not a recitation.

Some readings I’ve attended have such good performers that I enjoy their poem all out of proportion to how the poem works as a text on a piece of paper. In other words, the poem comes alive through the poet’s voice. It exists as a verbal poem, an oral piece of art. When I read the poem later, it’s sometimes not nearly as dynamic or interesting. I tend to regard oral poetry as its own separate category.

GER: 23 Issues of Autumn Sky have been published in the last six years. The presentation and quality of work have always been outstanding.  As editor/publisher of Autumn Sky could you describe the benefits of publishing a magazine and comment on interactions with poets who have been published by Autumn Sky?

CKL: Thank you. I appreciate your kind words regarding my journal. The benefits of publishing are mostly personal: I was able to read and publish the poems that I most loved—the ones that made my skin tingle. I was given the opportunity to promote formal poetry in an era where formal poems aren’t read much in the literary world. I met many wonderful artists and poets whose work and friendship I value.

Interacting with the poets I published was always interesting: some were meticulous, some were difficult, some were wildly enthusiastic, some were terse, some were young, and some were old. I could go on, but I think you get the idea. Poets are ordinary people who practice an art for which almost no one gets paid. One and all, the poets were incredibly generous for allowing me to publish their poems for free.

GER: Publishing a magazine is time consuming. What effect did producing the magazine have on your own poetry?

CKL: It squashed it like a bug. No, really. Before I started publishing Autumn Sky Poetry I wrote all year round. I had some prolific years and some when I didn’t write much, but I still wrote almost every month. Publishing a poetry journal meant that I spent a lot of time reading submissions. I didn’t have as much time to write. I mostly wrote in April.

GER: As a poet/editor/publisher what advice can you give to poets on submitting work to magazines or publishing houses?

CKL:  You’re going to get the same old advice from me every other editor gives! Read the guidelines. I wish I was joking but I’m not. It’s incredibly annoying to receive submissions that didn’t follow the guidelines. Eventually I just started rejecting those without even reading the poems.

As a poet, my advice is to keep trying. I had to let some poems go not because they weren’t gorgeous, but because they didn’t fit in with the rest I’d already accepted for any given issue.

Last, please don’t use any fancy typefaces, flashing backgrounds, dancing bananas, or other gimmicks when sending in your work. The poem is the point.

GER: Six years is a long run for a literary magazine. Do you have any plans to bring on a new issue in the future?

CKL: I told myself to take an entire year off and then reconsider. I was seriously burnt out from reading submissions. It’s hard work. Next January I will let you know if I’m going to jump in the water again.

GER: What projects are you currently working on?

CKL:  I’m working on a novel that grew out of The Quantum Archives (I’m revising it as we speak). It’s the first in a literary sci-fi trilogy set in the near future. I plan on publishing the first one in late summer, with the next two to follow several months later, respectively. The first novel contains the speculative poems I wrote for The Quantum Archives, one for each chapter. It tells the story of Eve and her sister Sarah who has invented a quantum imager, a device that allows her to mentally eavesdrop inside the mind of someone living in the past. Unfortunately, an obsession with the trauma of their parents’ deaths fractures Sarah’s emotional stability and spurs an unexpected enemy into fanaticism. Eve grapples her sister and the outcry surrounding the imager’s invention until her survival becomes more important than her need for self-denial.

I also plan on publishing another sci-fi novel in the near future: Who Saw the Deep. This manuscript was a semi-finalist in this year’s Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award. Publishers Weekly reviewed it:

“This novel is well written, original, and clever. Noah Heath has just completed his doctorate in computer science and his father suggests he give himself a break and help a local senior citizen with some handyman chores. Amelia is a woman that Jaime Heath has known since childhood. On Noah’s first day of work, he notices a flash in the sky, a silver needle, but Amelia denies seeing it. Even so, he hears her call her daughter, Leah, saying, “it’s happening again.” When he returns home, his father starts telling him about the family “artifacts,” a few chunks of old metal. Noah starts to question, and more importantly, believe his father and Amelia’s tales of centuries old invasion and the part their forebears played in it. That the power of computers is limited only by our imaginations makes the tale convincing; the lack of little green men and the highly plausible abilities of the villains make it wonderful reading. It’s a pity to classify this book as science fiction; it reads more like the ancient myths, or even fairy tales. The author really knows his characters and uses them beautifully. Perhaps he’s had centuries to develop them.”

[Disclaimer: Publishers Weekly is an independent organization and the review was written based on a manuscript version of the book and not a published version.]

You can read the poetry of Christine Klocek-Lim in The Fox Chase Review at this link: 2012 SU