Tag Archives: Dylan Thomas

10 Questions for Robert Milby

Robert Milby 7Robert Milby, of Florida, NY has been reading his poetry in the Hudson Valley and beyond since March, 1995. He hosts 3 Hudson Valley poetry series: Florida Library Poetry Café in Florida, NY, Noble Coffee Roasters in Campbell Hall, NY and Mudd     Poets Poetry series at Mudd Puddle Café, New Paltz, NY. He has been published widely in several dozen magazines and 12 anthologies. He and Carl Welden are the poetry and Theremin duo, Theremin Ghosts! haunting the Hudson Valley each October since 2003. Robert wrote the column Poets Comitatus: Dead Poets of the Hudson Valley, for Heyday Magazine. He was also co-founder and a board member of the Northeast Poetry Center’s College of Poetry workshop series at Seligmann Estate in Sugar Loaf, NY. Robert’s first book of poetry is Ophelia’s Offspring (FoothillsPublishing, 2007). His 2nd book, Victorian House: Ghosts and Gothic Poems—publication…still… pending. He is the author of several chapbooks and cds. Most recent chapbook: Crow Weather (Fierce Grace Press, 2009). http://www.robertmilby.com/

 Interview with g emil reutter 

Robert Milby (1)

The Interview

GER: Will Nixon has said you are the hardest working poet in the Hudson Valley. Tell us about the Hudson Valley poetry scene and how you find the time to host and read at its many venues?

RM: The Hudson Valley poetry scene stretches, from Westchester County, up past Albany, NY. This is excluding the NYC poetry circuit (is far too large and diverse to discuss here).                                                   Albany’s poetry scene is massive as well, but I am more familiar with it.

There is a strange absence of younger poets today.  I began reading my poems and the works of the greats, in public, back in March, 1995, when I was turning 25.  I sought out readings all over the Valley, and found that there was a great variety of poets, yet, there tended to be large and consistent groups of of high school, college, grad students, and in general, young poets in addition to the prevalent middle-aged and elders.

After 6 months of reading at as many poetry open mics as I could(in galleries, coffeehouses, cafes, bookstores, libraries, bars) I began hosting a poetry series with a group of young poets at The Beatnik Hollow in Wappingers Falls, NY. My travelling group (poets I had met around the Valley in spring and summer of ’95), Omniscient Omnibus, gradually became well-known as an official group of poets with aims of publication and featured readings. We decided to look for venues to host readings at.  I found The Beatnik Hollow, having heard about on a radio broadcast.

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The poetry scene itself was rich and exciting in the pre-Internet, and cell phone days. The ‘Net was relatively new back in 1995–many did not have access to it in my region. We drew up fliers by hand; folks did them on computers, and we hung them around the region. There were not as many poetry readings back then in the mid-lower Hudson, but those well-attended readings, were solid. These days, we have more readings in the Hudson Valley–many are excellent, but often, there are no young poets, whatsoever.  This is not only unsettling, but also serving to be a problem now, and a crisis in the future. Without the freshness, innovation, intellect, and passion of the young, poetry readings become too relaxing and dry up. Not to say that older poets are not or can’t be exciting.  But often, in the Hudson Valley region, there is a lack of intensity that is crucial for poetry readings to thrive.  That lack is due to the absence of young poets.

I have hosted 26 poetry series since September, 1995; 27 if I count my current co-hosting of the venerable Calling All Poets series at the Howland Center in Beacon, NY. 4 years ago I was hosting 8 regular series. No young poets were–only middle-aged and geriatric poets. Currently, I host 3, and I co-host the Calling all Poets series. I have the time because I do freelance during the day, and interview people for a small, local arts paper; teach workshops, in addition to hosting readings and setting up readings for myself and many others, all over the Hudson Valley, NYC, and beyond.

I am a grass-roots poet.   I “hold” a library card.  I buy used books at book sales. New books at indie bookstores, when able.    I do not have a Bachelor’s Degree.  Younger poets need to put in their biography which poets have stirred their hearts and minds, taught them how to see the world; venerate Freedom and Love; not where they got the MA, MFA , or PhD, in English.

Why does it matter, when a poet is pouring out her or his heart on stage, which degree they “hold,” or where they went to college to buy the expensive degree(s)? Degrees are more important in secret societies or some job interviews, not to determine a poets’ credibility–only they can do that, by sharing their work in public and with publishers. 

Robert milby 2GER:  You grew up on Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Matthew Arnold and Alfred Lord Tennyson. How have they influenced you?

RM: The Romantics (English, French, German Russian, Italian) and the Victorians, and Pre-Raphaelites are my chief influences for poetry.

I respect the Dadaists, Avant-Guard, Surrealists, the Beats, the New York School, but do not rely on them, nor do I return that often to them.

Modern poets such as Teasdale, Yeats(who was a late Victorian then, a modernist) Millay, Wallace Stevens, Vachel Lindsay, DH Lawrence, Ezra Pound, Maxwell Bodenheim, Amy Lowell, Robinson Jeffers, Hilda Doolittle, Dylan Thomas, Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes, Heaney, McGuckian, Paul Durcan, Michael Longley, Carl Sandburg, Hart Crane, Harry Crosby, Rilke, TS Eliot, Spender, Milosz Frost, Ransom, C. Day-Lewis, MacLeish, Merrill Moore, Anne Sexton, Lorca, Gottfried Benn,  Robert Lowell, Philip Larkin, Fernando Pessoa, Theodore Roethke, Randall Jarrell, WC Williams, Delmore Schwartz,  Maire Brennan, Harry Chapin, Nick Drake, Joni Mitchell, Gordon Lightfoot, and others.

Novelists: Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Wilkie Collins, the Brontes, Anthony Trollope, Jane Austen, George Elliot, Victor Hugo, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Dostoyevsky,  and others of the late 18th, and entire 19th century are my chief novelist interests.

Modern Novelists:  Ian McEwan, Arturo Perez Reverte, Hesse, Kafka, Umberto Eco, Tracy Chevalier, Steinbeck, Agatha Christie, Caleb Carr.

GER: There was a recent article asking where the poets have gone on social issues. You consider yourself a political and social writer of social consciousness. Where do you fit in the modern poetry scene and are poets addressing social issues ?

RM: I began, when I started writing poetry ( June, 1987)  and remain a political and social-conscious poet. I feel that my political poetry is effective and often a vanguard for younger poets to heed. No. There are not enough poets writing political and socially-relevant work.  Public schooling, main stream mass-media, and electronics are the reason younger people/poets do not engage.  How ironic!

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GER: Your first full book of poetry Ophelia’s Offspring was released in 2007. Share with us how the collection developed?

RM:Ophelia’s Offspring(Foothills Publishing, June 2007) is a sampling of my diverse interests(Literature, politics, social consciousness, ecology, male-female relationships, family, gothic, ghosts, life and death matters.  I did not write specifically for that manuscript, per se; rather, I compiled older and newer poems, such as one written when Clinton was in his 2nd term, several penned as a result of US politics during and after 9/11, Katrina, a near fatal car accident I suffered while rushing to host a poetry reading series back in November, 1995, a few about ex-girlfriends, one about an ex-fiancé, etc.)

GER: You have said you see a decided lack of originality in a lot of modern poetry. Please expand on this?

RM:  I see a lack of originality in modern poetry for one reason and one reason only:  Younger and older poets are not reading the Classics and contemporary poets to the degree that I hoped they would.  A poet needs to study the classics, and explore contemporary poets.to shape their own vox as a writer.

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GER: As a poet who performs frequently in the Hudson Valley scene and who tours other states what value do you place on performance?

RM: I enjoy reading in states outside of my home state, New York. Performance is vital.  To paraphrase the great Harry Chapin:  “You must seduce the audience over and over.” It is important to keep the crowds’ interest.  A poet can connect with his or her audience in many ways. It is up to the novice and/or younger poet to go to readings and study the poet onstage.  Take notes if need be.

GER: Please share with us your experience as a touring poet?

RM:My experiences as a touring poet, whether each October with Thereminist, Carl Welden performing as Theremin Ghosts! Visiting colleges such as Vassar, SUNY Oneonta, SUNY Oswego, etc.  An alternative community in upstate VT, Boston, Cambridge, Lennox, Mass.  Sites in CT, NJ, NYC, Saratoga Springs, Long Island, Northeastern PA, have all enriched my writing, mind, and purpose as a poet–to show that poetry is crucial to the human condition, now more than ever in America.

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Tell us about the collaboration that brought about the book Ghost Prints?

RM:  Ghost Prints.  I am friends with Hudson Valley horror novelist, Jason Gehlert.  I have had him as a featured reader on several occasions headlining my poetry venues, interviewed him for the Delaware and Hudson CANVAS(Bloomingburg, NY) and he thanked me by inviting me to contribute some of my ghost and gothic poems and prose poems to Ghost Prints(Black Bedsheet Books, Antelope, California, 2010)

GER: You currently lead the Northeast Poetry Center’s College of Poetry Workshop. What do you learn as a workshop leader and what are the benefits to poets who attend?

RM:  The Northeast Poetry Center’s College of Poetry workshop and readings series was founded in early 2009 by poet William Seaton, poet and bookstore owner Steven Calitri, and myself, to further the development and celebration of the written and spoken word in the Hudson Valley, NY. We operated out of Calitri’s then-successful/now defunct indie bookstore, Baby Grand Books in downtown Warwick, NY. One of our Board members and major supporter–was peformance poet, educator, fiction writer (and good friend of Musician/Singer-Songwriter, Patti Smith) Janet Hamill. We had a successful run of workshops, famous guest poets such as Ed Sanders(of the Fugs), academic Robert Kelly, Beat and Beat-influenced poet the late Janine Pommy-Vega, poet and owner of the Bowery Poetry Club, Bob Holman, Irish poet, Eamon Grennan, The NPC/College of Poetry has served its purpose and is coming to an end in early December, 2014, after a 5 year run.

Not every poet would enjoy workshops, but I find, after leading many of them since the late 1990’s, that they can be a great resource, inspiration, and motivation for novice and younger poets to develope their crafts, enjoy supportive feedback, and find their voice as a poet. Older poets who may need some brushing up on skills, outreach, and credibility will find this at good workshops. A successful poetry workshops inspires, teaches, and helps to discover courage and encourage freedom in the young, novice, and older poets.

robert milby 6GER: What current poets have influenced you and why?

RM: Current poets:  Seamus Heaney(recently deceased) WS Merwin, and several others of international reknown. Currrent and former NY state poets who consistently inspire and influence:  Skip Leon, Ken Van Rensselear, Carl Welden, Arthur Joseph Kushner, Steve Hirsch, Bonnie Law, William Seaton, Guy Reed, Janet Hamill,  Christopher Wheeling, Adrianna Delgado, Barbara Adams, Irene O’Garden, Christopher P. Gazeent, Ken Holland, Chris Wood, Rebecca Schumejda, Mona Toscano, Haigan Smith, Dominic Melita, Mauro Parisi, Mike Jurkovic, Jim Kenny, Glen River, Jim Eve, Glenn Werner, Raphael Kosek, Will Nixon, Frank Boyer, Marina Mati, Gordon Riggs, Roberta Gould, Teresa Costa,  Donald Lev(of Home Planet News), David Kime, Walter Worden, Cheryl Rice, Wynn Klosky, Led Klosky, Ted Gill, Franklin Schneider, John Douglas.  These local poets and the aforementioned famous poets inspire me with their humanity and courage.

GER: What projects are you currently working on?

RM: Current projects:  Theremin Ghosts!  Poetry and Theremin performance with Carl Welden, who plays Theremin, to support my ghost poems, and Christopher Wheeling–Geist host. We are on the 12th Annual Hudson Valley, NY Tour, October, 2014.  I read the ghost poems, Welden plays Theremin in front of crowds of all sizes.

Working with Calling All Poets, Inc. as a poetry series co-host and Board Member.  The CAPs poetry series, one of the oldest in the Hudson Valley, meets 8pm on First Fridays at Howland Center, Main St. Beacon, NY.  We are over 15 years old, and host at a popular reading site in the Valley, Howland Center (historic landmark, 1872).

 Also, I am working on a novel about French poet, Baudelaire. Hosting my three, regular poetry series at Mudd Puddle Cafe, in New Paltz, NY, The Florida Public Library in Florida, NY, and Noble Coffee Roasters, in Campbell Hall, NY. And daily writing:  journal, poems, fiction.

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The  poetry of Robert Milby is forthcoming in the Autumn 2014 edition of  The Fox Chase Review 

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2nd-saturday-poets-1-21-12-guarnieri-reutter-readiing-017-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA) http://gereutter.wordpress.com/

Poetry in the News…

hear ye

Dylan Thomas: Rock ‘n’ roll poet

http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20141016-dylan-thomas-rock-n-roll-poet

Meet the people making poetry cool again in Ireland

http://www.thejournal.ie/lingo-festival-poetry-ireland-spoken-word-1726028-Oct2014/

Oklahoma City’s poetry scene is lively, growing

http://newsok.com/oklahoma-citys-poetry-scene-is-lively-growing/article/5353660

Edgar Allan Poe Was a Vampire

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/119854/poet-edgar-allan-poe-alien-angel-jerome-mcgann-review

Syrian sisters’ singing, poetry on Mideast crises goes viral

http://english.alarabiya.net/en/media/2014/10/15/Syrian-sisters-singing-poetry-on-Mideast-crises-goes-viral-.html

Mindy Nettifee moves with inspiring poetry

http://www.sonomastatestar.com/features/2014/10/14/mindy-nettifee-moves-with-inspiring-poetry

Taipei begins countdown to poetry festival

http://www.taiwantoday.tw/ct.asp?xItem=222878&ctNode=445

Drunk Poetry Fans and the First Reading of ‘Howl’

http://time.com/3462543/howl/

Poetry and Catastrophe

http://www.thenation.com/article/181810/poetry-and-catastrophe#

215 Festival

http://www.215festival.org/

Poetry in the News…

the-poet-kelly-drive, Philadelphia, Pa. Photo-by-katie-reutter

The Poet-Kelly Drive, Philadelphia, Pa. Photo-by-Katie-Reutter

Pinsky Teaches Poetry…to the World

http://www.bu.edu/today/2014/robert-pinsky-art-of-poetry/

The new poet laureate: ‘Keep your mouth half-shut’

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/09/26/capital-download-charles-wright-on-becoming-poet-laureate/16215497/

Poetry on prescription from the Emergency Poet

http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-29352405

Tyler Knott Gregson’s Poetry Cracks Best-Seller Lists

http://online.wsj.com/articles/tyler-knott-gregsons-poetry-cracks-best-seller-lists-1411060387

Michael Lista, On Poetry: Why Poetry Sucks

http://arts.nationalpost.com/2014/09/26/michael-lista-on-poetry-why-poetry-sucks/

International Poetry Festival Welcomes Poet Lola Koundakjian

http://asbarez.com/127299/international-poetry-festival-welcomes-poet-lola-koundakjian/

Spectator competition: when prose and poetry meet (plus: verse in the manner of Revd W.A. Spooner)

http://blogs.spectator.co.uk/culturehousedaily/2014/09/spectator-competition-when-prose-and-poetry-meet-plus-verse-in-the-manner-of-revd-w-a-spooner/

Local poet publishes book of ‘observational’ poetry through national magazine foundation

http://downtowndevil.com/2014/09/25/61116/phoenix-shawnte-orion-chapbook-publish/

Poetry, roses on McPhilips’ grave

http://tribune.com.ng/arts-culture/item/17151-poetry-roses-on-mcphilips-grave

David Martin wins $6,000 CBC Poetry prize

http://www.thestar.com/entertainment/books/2014/09/22/david

_martin_wins_6000_cbc_poetry_prize.html

Dylan Thomas remembered on National Poetry Day

 http://www.southwales-eveningpost.co.uk/Dylan-Thomas-remembered-National-Poetry-Day/story-23004815-detail/story.html#OE1PMK6CJyIlGhpe.99

Dylan Thomas: Wales prepares to resurrect the poet’s reputation

The poet, an ‘unlikely icon’ relaxes outdoors in 1946.?I

Thanks to Books Inq.

http://www.theguardian.com/books/2013/oct/05/dylan-thomas-centenary-wales

10 Questions for Linda Nemec Foster

LindaPortrait2009- Photo Courtesy of Robert TurneyLinda Nemec Foster graduated magna cum laude from Aquinas College and received her M.F.A. from Goddard College. From 1980-2002, she taught poetry workshops for the Michigan Creative-Writers-in-Schools Program.

Foster is the author of nine collections of poetry: A History of the Body (Coffee House Press, 1987); A Modern Fairy Tale: The Baba Yaga Poems (Ridgeway Press, 1992); Trying to Balance the Heart (Sun Dog Press, 1993); Living in the Fire Nest (Ridgeway Press, 1996) which was a finalist for the Poet’s Prize; Contemplating the Heavens (Ridgeway Press, 2001); Amber Necklace from Gdansk (Louisiana State University Press, 2001) which was a finalist for the Ohioana Book Award in Poetry; Listen to the Landscape (Eerdmans Publishing, 2006) which was short-listed for the Michigan Notable Book Award; Ten Songs from Bulgaria (Cervena Barva Press, 2008); and Talking Diamonds (New Issues Press, 2009) which was a finalist for ForeWord Magazine’s 2010 Book of the Year in Poetry.

Over 300 of her poems have appeared in various magazines and journals. In 1997 she founded the Contemporary Writers Series (CWS) at Aquinas College and currently is a member of the Series’ programming committee.  You can visit her at: http://www.lindanemecfoster.com/

TalkingDiamonds-Cover

GER: Tell us about your latest release Talking Diamonds and the inspiration behind the development of the collection.

LNF:  Talking Diamonds was published in 2009 by New Issues Poetry & Prose    (sponsored by Western Michigan University) and was the culmination of six years of writing the poems and sequencing the collection.  During most of that time, the title was different but the theme of the manuscript was always the same:  death, loss, faith, doubt, and the strong redemptive effect of art on the human psyche.  From the first poem, “The Field Behind the Dying Father’s House,” to the last, “Trinity,” there is a progression of imagery and metaphor that speaks to the life journeys we all experience.  The book is divided into three parts:  the first section deals with death and loss; the second part deals with how the landscapes we live in influence our sense of transitions; and the final section is devoted to ekphrastic poems–all the poems are inspired by visual art.  During the time I was drafting and revising the manuscript, I was dealing with a number of losses in my life–including the declining health of my father.  He died two months before the book was published.  That experience (and others) really influenced my creative process and the poems I was writing at the time.  When I started sending the collection out for publication, I actually thought that no editor would be interested because of its somber tone but I couldn’t (and wouldn’t) “lighten it up.”  When New Issues Press accepted the manuscript in the spring of 2008, editor William Olsen was impressed with its distinctive voice and lack of guile:  in other words, I was correct to follow my instincts and not try to “re-work” the poems.  Olsen also saw the collection as being more about transformation than strictly loss.  He suggested the book’s title from one of the poems that reflected this theme and it was “Talking Diamonds.”  I’m indebted to his careful and diligent reading of my work.

linda nemec foster 2GER: You have a long history of conducting workshops for poets. What are the benefits to the poets who attend and the benefits to you?

LNF: I’ve taught creative writing workshops for over 30 years.  From 1980-2002, I was very involved with the Creative-Writers-in-the-Schools sponsored by the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs.  This program placed poets and writers in K-12 schools (both public and private) throughout the state of Michigan in residencies that lasted anywhere from several days to several months.  On the average, I would do 3-5 residencies in an academic year.  I loved interacting with the students (especially in grades 4-12); their enthusiasm and interest were infectious and always inspired my own work in the process.  The most memorable workshop I conducted during those years was in the spring of 1996.  I spent a week at an elementary school in Grand Rapids (with 3rd and 4th graders) where most of the student population were either Hispanic or African-American.  In the middle of that week, there was an after-school shooting in the playground.  Miraculously, no one was killed or seriously injured but it did “shake-up” the city.  This incident really gave my students in the poetry workshops a sense of purpose when they came to school the next day.  They all wanted to write about the incident; I channeled that desire to focus not on guns and violence but on their sense of identity in the community.  It was such a positive experience that the Grand Rapids Press did a major two-page article on the workshops.  I’ve also taught on the college level as an adjunct professor and guest lecturer on quite a number of campuses in the Midwest and elsewhere.  And I’ve lead community workshops for adults in art centers, libraries, museums, and galleries.  The most satisfying was a Master Level class I taught in 1999 at the Detroit Institute of the Arts:  I was awarded a teaching fellowship by the National Writer’s Voice (sponsored by their NYC office) to conduct an advanced poetry workshop.  The theme of the workshop was ekphrastic poetry and I used the exhibits at the Institute as springboards to assign the poetry exercises.  There were only nine participants–all women–who had gone through a competitive submission process to be accepted for the program.  As the semester progressed, I realized they were all fine writers who wrote  poetry that inspired my own writing–every exercise I gave them, I also did.  Several of these former students have gone on to win awards and publish books.  Nothing is more satisfying for a teacher.

GER: You have received a number of awards and grants. How important was it to your writing career to have received such recognition?

LNF: When I was at Goddard College studying for my MFA in creative writing, one of my teachers and mentors Stephen Dobyns had a discussion with me about awards, grants, etc.  His advice was not to be obsessed with winning recognition–just keep focused on the work.  But I have to admit, it is a wonderful feeling to get accolades for  your poetry.  My books have been finalists for the Ohio Book Award (Amber Necklace from Gdansk), ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year (Talking Diamonds), Michigan Notable Book Award (Listen to the Landscape), and the Poet’s Prize from the Roerich Museum (Living in the Fire Nest).  My work has also received awards from the Arts Foundation of Michigan, ArtServe Michigan, the National Writer’s Voice, and the Academy of American Poets, among others.  I was also selected to be the first Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Probably the most notable recognition was winning the Creative Arts Award from the Polish American Historical Association.  The award was presented to me at a ceremony at the Polish Embassy in Washington, D.C.  The fact that all four of my grandparents immigrated to America from Poland made this award particularly significant.  I felt honored and humbled–as if the legacy of my family was also recognized.  Obviously, it is wonderful to have these kinds of affirmations for my poetry.  But, after all is said and done, Dobyns was right.  It really is the work that ultimately matters.  Without it, there really can’t be anything else.

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GER: A large body of your work has been published. Where do you get the inspiration for your poems? What is your process of crafting each one?

LNF: Another teacher of mine, Ken Mikolowski at Wayne State University, once told the  class that “anything can be poetry, not everything is.”  In other words, anything you experience can become the inspiration for a poem.  The difficult work is transforming that experience–with a unique voice and vision–into a poem that can be accessible to the reader/listener yet can maintain a palpable mystery in its core.  I have gained my inspiration from family tragedies to strangers’ random conversations I overhear in restaurants, from crass tabloid headlines to extraordinary works of art.  Anything is possible and everything should be on the table.  Regarding my process, when I write a poem I always start by writing in longhand.  I go through 5-10 drafts on yellow legal notepads before I continue to draft and revise on the computer.  That’s when I see the shape of the poem as the line breaks, stanza breaks, and general form can be visualized.  In my process, the content comes first and then the form.  But both have to work as seamless, intertwined entities for a poem to truly become a unique vision.  It’s the ultimate balancing act.  “Without a net,” as another mentor joked.

Amber NecklaceGER: Tell us about your collection Amber Necklace  and the inspiration behind the collection.

LNF: Amber Necklace from Gdansk was published in 2001 by Louisiana State University Press.  This full-length collection of poems was inspired by my Polish-American heritage and the first visit to my family’s homeland in 1996.  The book reflects on the immigrant experiences of my grandparents–an experience of loss and discovery, of ambivalence and pride, of deep tragedy and redemption.  My own ethnicity as the daughter of second-generation immigrants from Poland is colored by America’s somewhat disinterested view of the “other” Europe–only recently emerged from history’s dark shadow–and of a country that for over a hundred years did not exist as a political entity on a map.  In the book’s opening poem, “The Awkward Young Girl Approaching You,” I struggle with this sense of ethnic identity:      “Who will speak for the dispossessed,/those who come from nowhere,/whose birthplace cannot be found/on any map…?”    My attempts to reclaim an ethnic heritage, to search for myself in the mirror of my family’s history, resonate throughout the poems.  Divided into four parts and employing a variety of styles and forms, the collection moves from lyric childhood memories and descriptions of immigrant life to prose poems that interweave the mythic past with the present.  Amber Necklace from Gdansk captures the sense of loss that can still permeate Poland–from Chopin’s self-exile, to the silence of rain, to the overwhelming horror of the Holocaust–and concludes with a group of poems that reveals resilience in the face of a haunted past and an iconoclastic present.  I have been back to visit Poland six times since 1996, but that first trip was truly a significant touchstone in my life and an amazing wellspring of inspiration for my writing.  It is my hope this book is a testament to the land, history, and culture of my ancestors.

GER: What poets do you read and who are your favorites?

LNF: I have a long list of poets who are my favorites:  Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Dylan Thomas, William Shakespeare, Rainer Maria Rilke, Lisel Mueller, Seamus Heaney, Phil Levine, Stephen Dobyns, Ellen Bryant Voigt, Heather McHugh, Li-Young Lee, Linda Pastan, Marilyn Nelson, Linda Hogan, Czeslaw Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, Wislawa Szymborska, Adam Zagajewski.  The list can go on and on.  Extraordinary, rich, and diverse voices that I read again and again to make some sense of this world and my place in it.

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GER: What advice would you give emerging poets on the submission process?

LNF: Have a thick skin!  The submission process is very competitive.  When you consider that some magazines and journals accept less than 5% of the work submitted, you can understand how many poets compare the whole process to a lottery system.  Book publishing (and I’m not talking about self-publishing) is also challenging.  Very good resources for submissions are the regular columns in Poets & Writers Magazine and the annual publication of The International Directory of Little Magazines and Small Presses.  The latter resource is excellent for emerging poets since it gives them a good sense of editors and who, what, and why they publish.  In the submission process, patience and persistence are sometimes just as important as talent.  It demands time and energy–a different kind of energy that is used in the creative process–but you just have to stick with it.  Do your homework.  Read and research those publications you’d like to submit to.  If you’re  just starting out, don’t submit work to The New Yorker.  Concentrate on those publications that are open to and encourage new and emerging poets.

GER: How important is it to you as a poet to share your work with audiences at poetry readings?

LNF: Let’s be honest:  being a poet can be a lonely profession.  The creating, crafting, and revising of poems demand concentration, time, energy, and discipline.  For me, it is very important to “get out into the world” and share my work with audiences on a regular basis.  Some poets don’t like to give readings and/or are not very good at public presentations.  I’ve heard some famous poets give awkward, poor readings and some relatively unknown poets give wonderful readings.  The bottom line is that a poem should be strong on the page and in the voice.  After all, poetry started as a purely oral tradition long before the invention of paper, the letterpress, or the laptop.  

LindaNemecFoster-3GER: Tell us about the poetry scene in Michigan in particular various reading series.

LNF: There are several very fine reading series in Michigan.  The one that I am most familiar with is the Contemporary Writers Series at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids.  I founded the Series (along with my husband) in 1997 and we have hosted some of the finest poets and writers:  Seamus Heaney, Michael Ondaatje, Peter Carey, Li-Young Lee, Scott Turow, Thomas Lynch, Lisel Mueller, Maxine Kumin, Linda Pastan, Linda Hogan, Joy Harjo, Quincy Troupe, David Mura, Clarence Major, etc.  Every academic year, we bring in 4 authors–two in the fall semester and two in the spring–and our audience averages around 200 per event.  Seamus Heaney broke the attendance record in May of 2006 when he read for over 640 poetry lovers.  It was a memorable night, especially when he told me after his reading that he thought the Contemporary Writers Series was one of the best reading series in the country.  Here is a link to the CWS website.  http://www.aquinas.edu/cw/index.html   I’d like to list five other series that deserve mention:  the Jack Ridl Visiting Writers Series at Hope College (Holland); the Gwen Frostic Reading Series at Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo); the program coordinated by Robert Fanning at Central Michigan University (Mt. Pleasant); the Hopwood Reading Series at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor); and the wonderful events hosted and organized by M.L. Liebler that take place throughout the Detroit area.  Last month, Poets & Writers invited me to write an article for their blog about one of the events in Detroit.  Here’s the link.  http://www.pw.org/content/linda_nemec_foster_ All of these programs attest to a lively and thriving poetry scene.

GER: What projects are you currently working on?

LNF:Earlier this year, I finished a collaboration with Hungarian musician Laszlo Slomovits.  This project had its beginnings when I first viewed the work of photographer Jacko Vassilev.  His portfolio, “The Dance of Zlatio Zlatev,” appeared in Harper’s Magazine and gave visual testimony to the impoverished and marginalized people of Eastern Europe.  Vassilev’s haunting portraits inspired me to write a sequence of poems, Ten Songs from Bulgaria, that was published by Cervena Barva Press in 2008.  The next step in this process occurred in 2011 when Slomovits read the chapbook and was immediately drawn to the poems as lyrics for original songs.  He began composing ten pieces to correspond to the ten poems:  our CD, Cry of Freedom, is the result of this partnership of art, poetry, and music.  It was released in 2013.  Michigan Public Radio (an affiliate of NPR) invited us into the studio for an interview.  Here’s the link. http://michiganradio.org/post/bulgarian-photography-and-michigan-poetry-inspire-album  Also, I am currently working on a new manuscript of prose poems, Fragments.

You can read the poetry of Linda Nemec Foster in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/Foster.html

g emil reutter-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA)

http://gereutter.wordpress.com/