Tag Archives: jack veasey

Winter 2015 Edition of The Fox Chase Review is Now Live

Pennypack Creek - Winter

Pennypack Creek – Winter

The winter 2015 edition of The Fox Chase Review is now live.

www.thefoxchasereview.org

This edition  features:

Poetry by:

M.P. Carver, Colin Dardis, Marty Esworthy, Melanie Eyth,  Gene Halus, Phil Linz, Gloria Monaghan, Stephen Page,  Chad Parenteau,  Prabha Nayak Prabhu,  Felino A. Soriano, Jack Veasey,  Lee Varon

Fiction by:

Ramona Long, Mary Pauer, Jeffrey Voccola

www.thefoxchasereview.org

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In the Words of Poets- Why Poetry Readings?

Why poetry readings? We gleaned some answers from poets we interviewed for our, 10 Questions Interview Series .

472“After a year of touring, I actually started to feel more confident reading my poems to an audience.  With confidence, I believe my “reading” performance has been enhanced.  I have come to the conclusion that there are poems that are “page” poems and “audience” poems.  To elaborate, “page” poems are more complicated and/or heady poems and are meant for a reader to read and re-read slowly, calmly, and in the confines of solitude.  “Audience” poems are those poems that are more musical and/or narrative in nature, which make it easier for the listener to follow, as you read with rhythm, feeling, proper breathing, and annunciation.  By reading and re-reading poems aloud, you learn how to accent the poem where you want the listener to really hear and feel what you are reading. “– Diane Sahms-Guarnieri – Philadelphia, Pa.

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Jack Veasey“Largely that they enable you to finish the act of communication. If you write because you have things to say, that’s essential. Otherwise, you’re just talking to yourself. As far as getting reactions and feedback go – that really isn’t the reason you do it. And you have to be happy with it by your own standards regardless of whatever reaction it gets, or doesn’t get. You don’t do it for the reaction, but you do create the work, most of the time, in order to be able to share it. Then it’s out of your hands.”- Jack Veasey, Hummelstown, Pa.

kimmika“I perform because I have to! The poetry keeps me alive. It demands to be written and it demands to be heard…I’m just the vehicle. I’ve always said, if I couldn’t be a poet, I would probably be a preacher. I don’t know. I see the world this way…as poetry, and songs and stories. My first language is poetry. I write because if I didn’t I don’t know if I would be able to breathe. And I guess I perform for the same reason I still pray…everybody has got to have something to believe in!”- Kimmika Williams Witherspoon, Philadelphia

jane“I’m glad to speak the poems and hear how they sound in a larger auditory space rather than mumbled in front of the computer screen, but I’m always nervous. Some of my poems have visual quirks that can’t be relayed.” – Jane Lewty, Amsterdam, Netherlands

stephen-page-in-front-of-wheat-photo“Reading aloud to an audience is a public event, a gift shared with more than one person in linear time.  I discovered by reading my own stuff aloud, especially while I practiced reading aloud to myself, I caught the glitches in the lines, the skips in the meter, the loss of the music I thought was there.  Thus, by reading aloud, or preparing to read aloud, I was better able to edit my work.” – Stephen Page- Buenos Aires, Argentina

va 1“In fact I love doing live readings. It gives you an opportunity to connect with the pulse of your readers. Gives you instant feedback about your work and the joy of seeing your words settle in people’s hearts. The experience is quite matchless! I’ve had youngsters approach me with endearing trepidation after my readings asking if they could keep in touch with me…I’ve had older, established poets come forth and comment on what they see as strengths in my poetry. These are all the delightful fall outs of live readings! Also, when you read live, you portray not just your work but the entire ethos to which you belong. The way you dress, the way you carry yourself and the way you interact with fellow poets also helps to convey your sensibilities as a poet. It’s a wholesome experience that goes beyond the scope of mere words”. – Vinita Agrawl, Mumbai India

john dorsey“I travel constantly. As far as how important it is, that really depends on why you’re out there. Do you want to sell books? Are you attempting to build lifelong friendships? Unless you have really bad social anxiety, I think everyone should try to get out there. I myself need the book sales to eat more often than not, but the friendships that I’ve made outweigh $10 here, $20 there  or some silly idea of fame, when 99 percent of people could care less about poetry anyway.” – John Dorsey, Cleveland, Ohio

linda-nemec-foster-2“Let’s be honest:  being a poet can be a lonely profession.  The creating, crafting, and revising of poems demand concentration, time, energy, and discipline.  For me, it is very important to “get out into the world” and share my work with audiences on a regular basis.  Some poets don’t like to give readings and/or are not very good at public presentations.  I’ve heard some famous poets give awkward, poor readings and some relatively unknown poets give wonderful readings.  The bottom line is that a poem should be strong on the page and in the voice.  After all, poetry started as a purely oral tradition long before the invention of paper, the letterpress, or the laptop.” Linda Nemec Foster, Michigan

thad 4“I’m usually able to make a connection. I remember reciting a piece on the top deck of a boat on the way from Hong Kong to Lama Island. Two people were listening, one from Australia and one from England. We were just lying there in the warm air. I was interrupted by our cruise host, but after the host left, the Englishwoman said to me, “Do the rest of it. I want to hear how it ends.” – Thaddeus Rutkowski, New York

Kristina 124 (1)“I have been writing since I was a young girl. Reading my work aloud, however, is something I have only done in the last eight to ten years. At first, I was very reluctant to stand up in front of an audience and read. I prefer the quiet, solitary process of writing. But, at some point, I realized that my poems needed to be heard. I had something to say and, even if it only reached one person, I needed to say it.” –Kristina Moriconi- Montgomery County, Pa.

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Robert Milby 7 “I enjoy reading in states outside of my home state, New York. Performance is vital.  To paraphrase the great Harry Chapin:  “You must seduce the audience over and over.” It is important to keep the crowds’ interest.  A poet can connect with his or her audience in many ways. It is up to the novice and/or younger poet to go to readings and study the poet onstage.  Take notes if need be.” Robet Milby, Hudson Valley New York

 

Coming Soon….The Winter 2015 Edition of The Fox Chase Review

The Banks of the Pennypack Creek in Philadelphia

The Banks of the Pennypack Creek in Philadelphia

The winter 2015 edition of The Fox Chase Review is now in production. This edition will feature:

Poetry by:

M.P. Carver, Colin Dardis, Marty Esworthy, Melanie Eyth,  Gene Halus, Phil Linz, Gloria Monaghan, Stephen Page,  Chad Parenteau,  Prabha Nayak Prabhu,  Felino A. Soriano, Jack Veasey,  Lee Varon

Fiction by:

Ramona Long, Mary Pauer, Jeffrey Voccola

 

Poets on the Porch 2013

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Please join us on July 13th @ 1pm for Poets on the Porch 2013 at Ryerss Museum and Library. We have a fantastic line up of 17 poets reading this year that poetry lovers will enjoy! Bring a folding chair, porch chair and enjoy a great afternoon on the porch at Ryerss on the summit of Burholme Park in Northeast Philadelphia.  All information on Poets on the Porch can be viewed at this link: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2013/06/05/poets-on-the-porch-july-13th-1-pm-to-430-pm/

Ryerss Museum and Library is convenient to the Ryers and Fox Chase train stations on the Fox Chase line and to the Septa 18 and 24 bus lines. There is plenty of on site parking.  

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Photographs from Poets on the Porch 2010 and 2011

Poets on the Porch 2011 Diane Sahms Guarneri reads

Poets on the Porch 2011 g emil reutter reads

Poets on the Porch 2011 Dan Magurie reads

Poets on the Porch 2011 Lynn Levin readsPoets on the Porch 2010- Rodger Lowenthal readsPoets on the Porch 2010 Catherine Staples readsPoets on the Porch 2010 - Patrick Lucy ReadsPoets on the Porch 2010 - Carlos Soto Roman reads.

Poets on the Porch – July 13th 1 pm to 4:30 pm

The Fox Chase Reading Series 

Presents

Poets on the Porch 

Ryerss Museum and Library

7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111

ryerss

The Poets

Rodger Lowenthal – Your Host

Rodger Lowenthal 4Rodger Lowenthal  is a poet from Montgomery County. His poetry and book reviews have appeared in a number of small press and electronic publications. He hosts a quarterly reading series at his home featuring poets and musicians. Rodger is an occasional book reviewer and host for the Fox Chase Review and Reading Series. You can also read his poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/09AW/23-RLowenthal.html

Bruce Kramer – Your Co-Host 

Telan and Okewole Reading Fox Chase Reading Series 6 30 13 022Bruce Kramer is a writer from Philadelphia. Most of his work has appeared in boring technical documents, medical publications, and marketing propaganda, but he has also been published in the occasional magazine and literary publication. He believes in cold beer, rock and roll, and baseball. He sometimes acts like he is named after Bruce Springsteen, but he knows he is named after somebody much cooler. He has poetry forthcoming from Barrelhouse Magazine and you can read his poetry in the Fox Chase Review at this link:http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/BruceKramer.html

 Mel Brake

MelBrake (1)Mel Brake has won several awards for his poetry and musical talents. He was born and raised in Philadelphia, and proud of it. He lives in Springfield, PA because the water is fresh, clear and tasty. Many publications and journals have published his poems including Fox Chase Review, Philadelphia Poets, Mad Poets Review, E Pluribus Unum:An Anthology of Diverse Voices, Apiary Magazine, Word Riot Magazine, Poetry Ink, The New Verse News and many others. You can read the poetry of Mel Brake in The Fox Chase Review at these links: 2008 WS2008 AW2009 AW2012 SU 

Suzán Jiván

SuzánJivánSuzán Jiván’s poems have appeared in Frog Pond and the Poetry Ink Anthology. Her chapbook Looking in and Sipping was released in 2012. You can read the poetry of SuzánJiván in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/Suz%C3%A1nJiv%C3%A1n.html

Steve Delia

Steve Delia in Open MicPoet Steve Delia has been crumpling balls of paper into the trash can for 30 years now.  His chapbooks are Revisited, Revised, Retyped and 1622 Church Street, Zoo Poetry. You can read the poetry of Steve Delia in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/2008/01-SteveDelia.html

 Alice Wootson

WootsonAAlice Wootson grew up in a suburb of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. She attended Cheyney University which is located outside of Philadelphia. She remained in the area after graduating with a BS Degree in Elementary Education. She earned a Masters Degree in Education and a Principal’s Certification from Cheyney University as well. Alice earned a Reading Specialist Certification from the University of Pennsylvania. You can read the poetry and fiction of Alice Wootson in The Fox Chase Review at these links: 2008 WS2010 WS

Marty Esworthy

MEsworthyMarty Esworthy is a leading advocate for sound poetry and meta-verse. Esworthy is a Megaera-award-winning poet, editor emeritus, Steel Point Quarterly, and renowned poetry impresario, is director of the Almost Uptown Poetry Cartel. He’s been published in numerous regional and national publications, including Haggard & Halloo, text_TOWER, Literary Chaos, Fledging Rag, House Taken Over, logodaedalus, Syzygy, The International Digest of World poetry, and the Miserere Review. Recent Esworthy tomes include hard reality, Pacobooks, 2004, and The Object Stares Back, Uh-Oh!, T&T Press, 2009.Twenty-Six Javanese Proverbs was awarded the 2006 R.E.Foundation Award for Outstanding Poetry from Iris G. Press in 2006. You can read the poetry of Marty Esworthy in The Fox Chase Review at this link:  http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/MartyEsworthy.html

Noah Cutler

CutlerNoahDNoah Cutler is a retired real estate lawyer living in St. Davids, Pennsylvania. He enjoys writing essays and novels, as well as writing and performing his poetry. You can read the fiction of Noah Cutler in The Fox Chase Review at these links: 2010 SU2011 SU

Lisa Sewell


Sewell_abrevLisa Sewell
 is the author of three books of poems: The Way Out (Alice James Books, 1998), Name Withheld (Four Way Books, 2006), Long Corridor (2009 Seven Kitchens Press). She is also co-editor, with Claudia Rankine, of American Poets in the 21st Century: The New Poetics (Wesleyan, 2007). She has received grants and awards from the Leeway Foundation, The National Endowment for the Arts and the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Recent work has appeared in American Letters and Commentary, Denver Quarterly, New Letters, Tampa Review, Laurel Review, The Journal and Colorado Review. She lives in Philadelphia and teaches in the English department at Villanova University

Dave Worrell 

DWorrellDave Worrell studied literature and philosophy at Union College in beautiful Schenectady, New York. His poems have appeared in US 1 WorksheetsMad Poets Review and Wild River Review. He has performed poems at Chris’ Jazz Café in Philadelphia and Cafe Improv in Princeton.  His latest collection is We Who Were Bound. You can read the poetry of Dave Worrell in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/09AW/07-DWorrell.html

 

Tamara Oakman 

OakmanTTamara Oakman, a graduate of Temple University, has completed her Master’s thesis in English—a book entitled, Snatched—at Arcadia University; won awards in poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction, and drama. She has been published by Many Mountains Moving, Philadelphia Stories, Mad Poets Review, and other journals. She is executive editor of Apiary Magazine. You can read the poetry of Tamara Oakman in The Fox Chase Review a this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/10WS/OakmanT.html

 

Christine O’Leary Rockey

COLeary-RockeyChristine O’Leary-Rockey is a poet, philosopher and a professor and with a tendency to lose things and incur student loans for frivolous subjects. Greatly influenced by W.B. Yeats, e.e. cummings and mystics such as Julian of Norwich, St. Francis of Assisi and Shel Silverstein, she has failed to come to terms with any real religious identity and is open to suggestions…. She’s been published in a variety of state and local publications, including The Fledgling Rag, The Experimental Forest, Steel Pointe Quarterly, Harrisburg Magazine, and Megaera. Christine is a member of Harrisburg’s infamous (almost) Uptown Poetry Cartel and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in November 2007 by Iris G. Press. You can read the poetry of Christine O’Leary Rockey in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/ChristineOLeary-Rockey.html

 Kimmika Williams Witherspoon

KWillams-WitherspoonKimmika Williams-Witherspoon, PhD  (Cultural Anthropology), M.A. (Anthropology), MFA (Theater), Graduate Certificate)Women’s Studies, B.A. (Journalism); is an Associate Professor in the Theater Department at Temple. Along with Eugene Martin (Film), William Witherspoon is a recent recipient of the Provost’s Seed Grant for Interdisciplinary Work ($50, 000.);the 2003 Provost’s Arts Commission Grant recipient; a 2001 Independence Foundation Theater Communications Group Grant, the 2000 winner of the PEW Charitable Trust $50,000 fellowship in scriptwriting, and the 1999, winner of the DaimlerChrysler “Spirit of the Word” National Poetry Competition  (Seattle) at the Unity’99 Conference, Kimmika Williams has also been the recipient of a host of awards and honors, including: the DaimlerChrysler Regional Poetry Contest (Philadelphia), the 1996, Lila Wallace Creative Arts Fellowship with the American Antiquarian Society and a two-time returning playwright with the Minneapolis Playwrights’ Center and Pew Charitable Trusts Playwrights Exchange.

The author of The Secret Messages in African American Theater: Hidden Meaning Embedded in Public Discourse” (Edwin Mellen Publishing, 2006) Williams was, at one time, Arts Producer for public radio, WXPN-88.5, reporter and columnist with the Philadelphia Tribune and television editor for the Chicago-based “Maceba Affairs Media Review Magazine. You can read the poetry of Kimmika Williams-Witherspoon in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/KimmikaWilliams-Witherspoon.html

 Paul Siegell

SiegellPPaul Siegell is the author of jambandbootleg (A-Head, 2009), Poemergency Room(Otoliths Books, 2008) and the forthcoming wild life rifle fire (Otoliths Books, 2009). He is a staff editor at Painted Bride Quarterly, and has contributed to The American Poetry ReviewBlazeVOXCoconutRattle and other fine journals. Paul has also been featured in the Philadelphia City Paper, Paste MagazineRelix Magazine and Bookslut. Kindly find more of Paul’s work at ReVeLeR @ eYeLeVeL. You can read the poetry of Paul Siegell in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/10WS/SiegellP.html

Jack Veasey

JVeaseyA 2010 nominee for a Pushcart Prize, Jack Veasey is a Philadelphia native who has been living in Hummelstown, PA for over 20 years. He is the author of ten published collections of poetry, most recently “The Sonnets” and “5-7-5” (both from Small Hours Press, 2007).  He is a member of Harrisburg’s Almost uptown Poetry Cartel. His poems have also appeared in many periodicals and a number of anthologies. You can read the poetry of Jack Veasey in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/JackVeasey.html

 Ryan Eckes 

RyanEckesRyan Eckes lives in South Philadelphia. He’s the author of Old News (Furniture Press 2011) and when i come here (Plan B Press 2007). He works at Community College of Philadelphia and Temple University. You can read the poetry of Ryan Eckes in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/RyanEckes.html

 Diane Sahms-Guarnieri

DIANE4Diane Sahms-Guarnieri is a Philadelphia Poet. Her first release, Images of Being, received critical acclaim.  Her second collection, Night Sweat, is awaiting a release date. Her poetry has appeared in a number of small and electronic press magazines. In May of 2013 Diane was awarded a grant for poetry by the AE Ventures Foundation. She is the Poetry Editor of The Fox Chase Review. http://www.dianesahms-guarnieri.com/

g emil reutter

g emil reutterg emil reutter is the author of ten collections of poetry and prose. His work has been published widely in the small and electronic press. He founded the Fox Chase Review and Reading Series in 2007. http://gereutter.wordpress.com/

Frank Sherlock

FrankSherlock (1)Frank Sherlock is the author of Over Here, The City Real & Imagined collaboration with CA Conrad) and Ready-to-Eat Individual, (a collaboration with Brett Evans.) Sherlock is also the author of Neighbor Ballads, a public poetry installation project with Erik Ruin that celebrates South Philadelphia’s immigrant communities. You can read the poetry of Frank Sherlock in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/08AW/13-FrankSherlock.html

 

Veasey Returns Home as Esworthy and O’Leary Rockey Sway the Museum

The Almost Uptown Poetry Cartel from Harrisburg, Pa. came to visit Ryerss Museum. Christine O’Leary Rockey and Marty Esworthy entertained the crowd with a joint reading and Jack Veasey returned home for his first reading in Philadelphia since 1991. The audience listened to a talented open mic group of Christian Thiede, Maria James Thiaw, Bill Fritz and Krystle Griffin.  Photos of the event are available at this link: http://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

Veasey, O’Leary Rockey and Esworthy in Fox Chase May 20th

The Fox Chase Reading Series presents our featured poet/writers reading on May 20th @2pm featuring the poetry of Jack Veasey, Marty Esworthy and Christine O’Leary Rockey at Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111.

Jack Veasey is a Philadelphia native who has been living in Hummelstown, PA for over 20 years. He is the author of ten published collections of poetry, most recently “The Sonnets” and “5-7-5″ (both from Small Hours Press, 2007). He is a member of Harrisburg’s Almost uptown Poetry Cartel.
His poems have also appeared in many periodicals including Christopher Street, The Pittsburgh Quarterly, Harbinger: A Journal Of Social Ecology, The Philadelphia Daily News, The Painted Bride Quarterly, Fledgling Rag, Oxalis, The Blue Guitar, Bone And Flesh, Zone: A Feminist Journal For Women And Men, Film Library Quarterly (Museum of Modern Art, NYC), Experimental Forest, Tabula Rasa, Wild Onions, Mouth Of The Dragon, Asphodel, Insight, The Irish Edition, The Harrisburg Patriot-News, The Harrisburg Review, The Princeton Spectrum, The Little Word Machine (U.K.), and The Body Politic (Canada), among others. His poems have also appeared in a number of anthologies, including Common Wealth: Contemporary Poets On Pennsylvania (Penn State University Press), Sweet Jesus: Poems About The Ultimate Icon (Anthology Press, Los Angeles), and A Loving Testimony: Remembering Loved Ones Lost To AIDS (The Crossing Press, Freedom, CA) and most recently in Assaracus. You can read his poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/JackVeasey.html and his interview at FCRS here 10 Questions for Jack Veasey

Christine O’Leary-Rockey is a poet, philosopher and a professor and with a tendency to lose things and incur student loans for frivolous subjects. Greatly influenced by W.B. Yeats, e.e. cummings and mystics such as Julian of Norwich, St. Francis of Assisi and Shel Silverstein, she has failed to come to terms with any real religious identity and is open to suggestions…. She’s been published in a variety of state and local publications, including The Fledgling Rag, The Experimental Forest, Steel Pointe Quarterly, Harrisburg Magazine, and Megaera. Christine is a member of Harrisburg’s infamous (almost) Uptown Poetry Cartel and was nominated for a Pushcart Prize in November 2007 by Iris G. Press. You can read her poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/ChristineOLeary-Rockey.html

Marty Esworthy is a leading advocate for sound poetry and meta-verse. Esworthy is a Megaera-award-winning poet, editor emeritus, Steel Point Quarterly, and renowned poetry impresario, is director of the Almost Uptown Poetry Cartel. He’s been published in numerous regional and national publications, including Haggard & Halloo, text_TOWER, Literary Chaos, Fledging Rag, House Taken Over, logodaedalus, Syzygy, The International Digest of World poetry, and the Miserere Review. Recent Esworthy tomes include hard reality, Pacobooks, 2004, and The Object Stares Back, Uh-Oh!, T&T Press, 2009.Twenty-Six Javanese Proverbs was awarded the 2006 R.E.Foundation Award for Outstanding Poetry from Iris G. Press in 2006. You can read his poetry in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/11June/MartyEsworthy.html