Tag Archives: joshua gray

Red Dashboard Cruises into Ryerss

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8074652084_ca16faf524_oFollowing the last snow of the winter Red Dashboard cruised on into Ryerss Museum and Library for a featured reading. Writers Elizabeth Akin Stelling, Barry Gross, Marion Deutche Cohen, g emil reutter, Joshua Gray, Erin Locks and Laura Madeline Wiseman brought new life into the parlor of the museum. Open mic readers Keya Acharya, Steve Delia and Diane Sahms-Guarnieri delighted the crowd. You can view more photographs here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438/

 

Red Dashboard in Fox Chase March 21st

red dashboard pressSaturday – March 21st @ 1 p.m The Fox Chase Reading Series presents the poets and writers of Red Dashboard Press. Open Mic will follow.  The reading will be held in the 2nd Floor Gallery of Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park. More information here: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/march-21st-the-fox-chase-reading-series-presents-red-dashboard-press/

March 21st – The Fox Chase Reading Series presents Red Dashboard Press

Saturday – March 21st @ 1 p.m The Fox Chase Reading Series presents the poets and writers of Red Dashboard Press. Open Mic will follow.  The reading will be held in the 2nd Floor Gallery of Ryerss Museum and Library, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. Ryerss sits atop the hill at Burholme Park.

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The Lineup 

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eas2Born in Fort Worth and raised in Carrollton, Texas, on Stockyard Rodeos and Pioneer Days during the 60-70s— Elizabeth Akin Stelling is a wife, mother, chef, an editor/writer, activist for CHD and grief counselling after losing her daughter to heart disease in 2000. Elizabeth is also managing editor of Red Dashboard LLC—Z-composition, Annapurna and Cowboy Poetry. She has works published in vox poetica, Referential Magazine, Linden Avenue Literary Journal, Curio Poetry, Wordgathering, River Review, Tuck Magazine, CrazyLitMag, Texas Observer Magazine, and culinary trade magazines. And known as Chef E, her food poetry has been heard on CroptoCuisine Radio, out of Boulder, CO. Her most recent poetry collection: My South by Southwest- A Cast Iron Tempo Recollection.

James Temp “Preacher” Kelley was born and raised in the Salt Grass area of the JTKelleyTexas Gulf Coast near Houston, Texas. It was his rearing between this area of Texas and his grandparents’ farm in the central part of the state that he started developing into the one thing that he most wanted most to be, a cowboy. After graduating from Sam Rayburn High School, in Pasadena, Texas, he embarked on a career in the United States Army, which lasted for over twenty years, until he retired in 1993. Upon his retirement “Preacher” went to work for a major pharmaceutical company in northeastern Pennsylvania. Throughout his life “Preacher” has worked with livestock and chased arena lights of the small town rodeo circuit as a saddle bronc rider, and a bull rider. He also spent quite a bit of his spare time as a working cowboy with various small cattle concerns throughout the country. All of the things associated with rodeo and working cowboys were his passion, a passion that he still has today at age sixty. He currently resides in a small town in the mountainous Coal Region of northeastern Pennsylvania with his wife Kathleen, a pack of dogs, a couple of cats and a house full of grandchildren.”

BarryGrossBarry Gross doesn’t remember exactly when he first wrote, “Observe and Record” in one of his journals, but he uses that phrase from time time to remind himself why he writes. He has participated in poetry readings in New Hope, Newtown, Trenton, Philadelphia, and Souderton, where many of this book’s poems have been performed. He’s worked as a department store Santa Claus, a stadium beer vendor, window washer, bartender, waiter, cook, proofreader, newspaper production, and currently works as a teacher. Barry reviewed books for the Times of Trenton, and his work has been seen in The Mill Hunk Herald, The North Colorado Review, and the Bucks County Playhouse Best of Talk Story 2014. “Coiled Logic,” a Red Dashboard LLC Press production, is his first chapbook. .

LauraMadelineWiseman

Laura Madeline Wiseman is the author of more than a dozen books and chapbooks and the editor Women Write Resistance: Poets Resist Gender Violence (Hyacinth Girl Press, 2013).Her poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, and reviews have appeared in Margie, Mid-American Review, Poet Lore, Blackbird, Arts & Letters, Prairie Schooner, Feminist Studies, Thirteenth Moon, American Short Fiction, and elsewhere. She has received an Academy of American Poets Award, a Mari Sandoz/Prairie Schooner Award, a Will P. Jupiter Award, a Susan Atefact Peckham Fellowship, a Louise Van Sickle Fellowship, several Pushcart Prize nominations, and grants from the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, the Focus for the Arts, the Center for the Great Plains Studies, and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. She has a masters from the University of Arizona in Women’s Studies and a doctorate from the University of Nebraska in English. Currently, she teaches English and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. http://www.lauramadelinewiseman.com/

Marion CohenMarion Deutsche Cohen is a mathematician, math prof, and the author of 23 books, including two memoirs. The latest memoir is Still the End: Memoir of a Nursing Home Wife. She teaches math and writing at Arcadia University in Glenside PA, where she has developed the course, Truth and Beauty: Mathematics in Literature, and is working on developing the course Alternating Currents: Societal Issues on the College Campus, where she will use, in lieu of a text, articles from The Chronicle of Higher Education. Other interests are classical piano, singing, Scrabble, thrift-shopping, ethnic food, four grown children, and five grands, including twins. Her website is:   www.marioncohen.net

Joshua Gray is an internationally published poet whose poems have been JoshuaGrayBioPicpublished in journals such as Poets and Artists, Front Range Review, Iconoclast, Zouch Magazine, Tar Wolf Review, Chaffin Journal and Blind Man’s Rainbow. He was the DC Poetry Examiner for Examiner.com for two years where he wrote reviews of books by local DC authors as well as reported on the local poetry scene. He regularly writes critiques of individual poems which can be read or linked to from his Web site. His book Beowulf: A Verse Adaptation With Young Readers In Mind was published by Zouch Six Shilling Press in 2012 and he is the editor of Pot and Sticks, a collection of poetry by Charles A. Poole, and Principles Of Belonging, Red Dashboard LLC Publishing. He lived in Kodaikanal, Tamil Nadu, India, but is currently back in the United States for a stint. http://joshuagray.co/

ErinLocks

Erin Locks has studied at CUNY Brooklyn, TNCJ Jersey, and is currently working as a Graduate Student in the field of Food/Economics and how it affects the family in various economies through history. She is a published poet, Annapurna Magazine, and attends open mics in New Jersey and PA.

 

 

 

Enjoy the Latest Poetry in the Fox Chase Review

fox chase reviewEnjoy the latest poetry in The Fox Chase Review by Jonel Abellanosa, Nathalie Anderson, Ashley Elizabeth Best, Lauren Camp, Philip Dacey, Dennis Daly, Joshua Gray, Lisa Lewis, Rodger Lowenthal, Tom Mallouk, Ellen Peckham, Russell Reece, Rebecca Schumejda, John Timpane and Frank Wilson. Follow the poets at this link: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/poetry.html

Principles of Belonging by Joshua Gray

POB CoverPaperback: 116 pages

Publisher: Red Dashboard LLC (November 9, 2013)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 1492993506

ISBN-13: 978-1492993506

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Review by Dennis Daly

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Audacity and ambition fused to a poetic temperament can get you a long way. Joshua Gray in his second book of poetry, Principles of Belonging, pushes the envelope in his artistic efforts to create a masterpiece of poetic unity. He nears a crescendo, but doesn’t quite get there. Yet he does give us a compelling narrative encompassing national tragedy, dysfunctional families, young love, and an overview of life’s ironies. That ain’t bad. Along the way Gray melds Sanskrit meter, Anglo Saxon verse, Welsh measures, blank verse, free verse (sometimes  rhymed), not to mention sonnets, other rhymed poems and a sympoe ( a strange poetic form invented by Gray).
 
The Sanskrit lines, the rules of which were developed well before the Homeric Age, soothe you with their subject appropriateness. The lines or padas are four feet of four syllables each, making sixteen syllables on a line. Excessive syllables are sometimes okay, but are not counted. The syllables are considered light or heavy depending on the juxtaposition of consonants and vowels. The rules are really simple and elegant and, in narrative forms, almost prosy. Gray avoids numerical intricacies and high art sophistications, keeping the original rule-based simplicity in his English adaptations.  Keep in mind that virtually all Sanskrit, including law, science, and mathematics, was composed in verse. For those interested in further pursuits of this form I found a book by Charles Philip Brown written in 1869 entitled Sanskrit Prosody and Numerical Symbols Explained (London 1869). It appears to be part of an academic collection and is easily located on the internet.
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Here are two padyas (stanzas) from Gray’s poem Village detailing Hindu cultural differences between the sexes,
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So honey was kept hidden away. Gan thought of when the man,
the honeywala, left last year: Gan and his brother Jay had wanted
honey; they snuck about the kitchen, but their mother had seen them, grabbed
a log from the fire, then chased the boys around the house as they ran out.
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She knew full well the boys would not be back home until late; the law
states that women must not eat before the men (and boys); thus,
she and Devi, her teen daughter, must wait until the three men ate
before either of them could. The boys stayed out past the rise of the moon.
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In the poem West Bengal Gray outdoes himself with a haunting political and personal narrative. The poet, using his Sanskrit meter, begins his piece this way,
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The next morning the train stopped in some town and everybody got off.
Hindus who rode the train roofs now descended; further off a crowd
of Muslims waited to board the train traveling the other way.
A sole chai-wala called out as he walked, clay cups in hand, hot chai balanced.
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The Table of Contents in The Gathering Principle begins in 1947 and ends with an Epilogue in 1994. The poems order themselves around human relationships tracked over the years. Oddly, Gray also orders them by poetic forms. For instance, in a section identified both with a date (1961) and the title Cynghanedd, Gray gives us three poetic adaptations of medieval Welsh verse. Cynghanedd literally means harmony and is a system of assonance and alliterations. The poet ends his piece Wildflowers harmoniously,
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On school days she’d wait, anticipating
The weekend, go to the creek and quietly
Harvest the richest hues; sometimes Bluettes
Would even mindlessly find a new future.
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With her brothers or alone, her brothers fighting or stoning
Trunks, she plucked not meanly but fondly, green and gold
And white as Fern Hill. The air could be chilling
Or warmed by the sun, the wonderful flora could take her in winter.
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Elaborate and elegant both! Gerard Manley Hopkins used this form to great effect and Dylan Thomas was clearly influenced by it.
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The sonnets and rhymed poems in this collection are a mixed bag. Some work very well. Others less well. An untitled sonnet example on page 89 that works extremely well deals with childhood’s faulty memories and compensating emotions.  Rhymes fall naturally in place infusing the story with complexity. The poet asks,
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How does one tell when another’s truth is wrong
As well? If Devi’s lost her memory
Perhaps it’s mine where truth can truly be.
I will not dance to illusion’s crippling song.
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My parents stayed behind, or so I’m told,
And didn’t travel with us on the train.
So where did all that I recall take place?
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When Jay took off and left us in the cold,
To prevent myself
From being a child insane,
I must have placed my parents in that space.
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But even the poems that clank with obvious and sometimes forced rhymes need only a minor change or two. The last end rhyme of the poem entitled Rick sounds a little off, but the first thirteen lines are perfect. The poem ends this way,
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So I went and told her why myself, but she beat
Me to the story’s end and laughed out loud:
This lady of light refused to keep me proud.
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May I suggest that Gray needs to edit a few of the rhymed poems in this collection, perhaps with a second set of eyes; and what is clearly a very, very good and interesting collection of poems may turn into a game-changer of a book. Speaking of editorial work, my favorite poem in this terrific collection, Doris/Deb, is placed on the wrong page in the Table of Contents (I’m reviewing from an electronic version). It relates the story of two struggling mothers and it reads wonderfully. Consider these lines, the first half of the poem,
Determined mothers make their children’s clothes.
I find that poverty will likely breed
Necessity. When we could barely feed
Ourselves—our kids—I quickly learned to sew,
And walked a ways for fabric, rain or snow.
I sewed a costume once for Halloween;
The ‘S’ was crooked, the cape a little green.
And later, after Rick and I had split,
The thread and needle helped me quite a bit.
A single mother is often the one who knows;
Determined mothers make their children’s clothes.
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Just for its poetic nerve and intrinsic formalist interest this book gets an “A” as in audacious. With a nod to what this book may ultimately become, I celebrate its already significant accomplishments.
 

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You can check out the book here: http://www.amazon.com/Principles-Belonging-Joshua-Gray/dp/1492993506/ref=sr_1_fkmr2_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1391856155&sr=1-1-fkmr2&keywords=Principles+of+Being+by+Joshua+Gray

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ddDennis Daly has been published in numerous poetry journals and magazines and recently nominated for a Pushcart prize.  Ibbetson Street Press published The Custom House, his first full length book of poetry in June, 2012. His second book, a verse translation of Sophocles’ Ajax, was published by Wilderness House Press in August, 2012. His third book of poems entitles Night Walking with Nathaniel has been accepted for publication by Dos Madres Press. A fourth book is nearing completion.

Joshua Gray in the Winter 2014 Edition of The Fox Chase Review

jgAnxiety by Joshua Gray

http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14jgray.html

Winter 2014 edition of The Fox Chase Review now on line

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The Winter 2014 edition of The Fox Chase Review is now available for you reading pleasure. Please note our new web home address: www.thefoxchasereview.org . This edition features:

Poetry by: Jonal Abellanosa, Nathalie Anderson, Ashley Elizabeth-Best, Lauren Camp, Phillip Dacey, Dennis Daly, Joshua Gray, Lisa Lewis, Rodger Lowenthal, Tom Mallouck, Ellen Peckham, Russell Reece, Rebecca Schumedja, John Timpane and Frank Wilson.

Fiction by:  Natalia Cherjovsky, Louise Halvardsson,Jen Michalski, Lester Mobley, Dawn Sperber, George Wyelsol and Chad Willenborg

The Editors

www.thefoxchasereview.org