Tag Archives: Seamus Heaney

10 Questions for Vinita Agrawal

va 1Born in Bikaner, India, on August 18th 1965, Vinita Agrawal did her schooling in Kalimpong and Kolkata and college from Baroda. She was is a Gold Medallist in M.A. Political Science from the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda and earned the UGC scholarship in College. She has worked freelance as a writer and researcher ever since but has remained a poet at heart. Her poetry has been published in print and online journals on countless different occasions so far, the prominent publications among them being Asiancha, Constellations, raedleafpoetry, The Fox Chase Review, Spark, The Taj Mahal Review, Open Road Review, CLRI, Kritya.org, Touch- The Journal of healing, Museindia, Everydaypoets.com, Mahmag World Literature, The Criterion, The Brown Critique, Twenty20journal.com, Sketchbook, Poetry 24, Mandala and others which include several international anthologies. Her poem was nominated for the Best of the Net Awards 2011 by CLRI. She received a prize from MuseIndia in 2010. Her poem Thoughts won a prize in the Wordweavers Contest 2013. Her debut collection of poems titled Words Not Spoken published by Sampark/Brown Critique was released in November 2013. http://www.vinitawords.com/

Interview with g emil reutter

The Interview 

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GER: You are a writer of poetry, fiction and non-fiction. What draws you to each of these forms?

VA: I am first and foremost a writer of poetry. I write so much of it that sometimes I think it’s a malaise with me. It’s my first love across all genres of writing. I write fiction occasionally – because some ideas simply cannot be expressed as a poem. They need a longer narrative and only prose will suffice to portray them adequately. Compared to fiction, I enjoy writing non-fiction more. I enjoy writing about spirituality, culture and travel, enjoy researching my subject and creating something that throws more light on it. That gives me great satisfaction.

GER: How did you come to being a poet?

VA: I’ve been writing poems since I was very young – as far back as five. I think my dad has some of my childhood verses saved up somewhere. I was good at English literature in school and received awards regularly in the subject. I contributed to school and college journals and other in house publications. But most of the poetry that I wrote till my early twenties was an outpouring of the angst of growing up and about teenage crushes. It had no literary worth at all. I made a bonfire of those diaries when I re read them at a later stage in life and realized how atrocious they were. 

Then there was a long phase of remaining a closet poet. I wrote regularly but what I considered as reasonably good poetry was rejected by editors as worthless. It was then I realized writing poetry was not merely the outpouring of emotions, rather it was a serious art of conveying the deepest meanings of life and portraying its most profound perspectives using the bare minimum of words. Because of this realization, I started reading poetry seriously. I concluded that if you didn’t know what the art was all about, how were you going to experiment with it? 

I read the classical poets like Byron, Keats, Wordsworth, Whitman and Eliot. I read works of the newer poets like Neruda, Paz and contemporary Indian poets like Jayanta Mahapatra, Nissim Ezekiel and Kamala Das. I have to confess that Neruda and Mahapatra blew me away! ” God!,” I told myself, “That is how I want to write!” I was officially bitten by the bug; writing poetry became a compulsion, an obsession…a desperate need. For me personally, it took the lid off the pressures of existence.

va 3GER: What poets have had an influence on your writing?

VA: As I mentioned in my previous reply, I’ve been majorly influenced by most great poets. There’s something to learn from each one of them. I learnt extravagance of imagery and emotions from Neruda, learnt pinpointed poignant succinctness from Mahapatra and the art of making guileless womanly confessions from Kamala Das.  I’ve also been very inspired by the works of RUMI, Vikram Seth, Jane Hirshfield and Seamus Heaney. 

I must also acknowledge the vast and varied influence that every good poet has on me. Sometimes I read a great piece of contemporary poetry and I don’t even know who’s written it but I want to treasure the experience of reading it.

Rather than a poet in totality, a poem per se has a greater impact on me. In that sense I get influenced by all good work. Reading a well written poem makes me write something worthwhile too. You could say that epiphany is my taskmaster!.

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GER: Tell us about Words Not Spoken and how the collection came about?

VA:  Words Not Spoken is my first collection of poems. It is published by Brown Critique/Sampark  India and was released in November 2013. 

The book is a potpourri of poems written over a considerable stretch of time. Some poems go back as far as 1997. I decided to include them in this collection because I could still relate to them emotionally. Besides, this being my first published collection, I did not want to miss any step of my poetic journey. 

The poems represent my perceptions of life with all its highs and lows, troughs and crests… They trace experiences of loss and grief, pride and joy, betrayal and pain from a very personal perspective. Some poems express my awareness of the injustices I see around me but mostly they centre around the intensely peculiar dimensions of womanhood –  its sentimental treasures and curious travails.  

Over the years I have discovered that pain has a penumbra of numbness attached to it. And that sooner or later, we choose this numbness to the acuteness. It is this invisible fine shift towards a state of stillness that inspires me to write. Endurance, in any form, is at the core of my writing.

GER: Please tell us about your work as a freelance writer and researcher?

vinita01VA:  Yes…I’ve changed many cities in the course of my life and therefore was unable to take up a regular job. So I decided to work freelance and work from home. Writing is a profession that allows you that freedom. I relish being able spend time at home and yet be fruitfully engaged with writing. It has its limitations of course but if you’re seeking to balance your personal and professional life than it really is the best option.

As freelance writer I’ve written development based articles, features on gender issues, penned middles for newspapers, written passionately about the Tibet issue, done interviews with prominent personalities in the spiritual/academic field like Robert Thurman, the Official Oracle of the Dalai Lama and even top Defence personnel! God knows how that happened! 

As a researcher, I presented two papers on Buddhism at international conferences in Sri Lanka and Vaishali under the Sakyadhita Banner. I have karmic leanings towards the Buddha and his teachings and have taken up researching his life and thoughts independently but with expert guidance from Geshes and scholars. I have to confess though, that I’m very slow with all this work that I’m doing. It’s born out of passion and an academic thirst. It has no deadlines or consolidate demands for being in the market so I take things easy with this aspect of my work.

The good thing that I see in doing it at all, apart from the fact them I read voraciously because of it, is that it puts me in touch with wonderful people and brilliant scholars. I enjoy interacting with them a lot. Sometimes I get to visit awesome ancient places in the course of my self-sponsored research. Anuradhapura, Vaishali and Sarnath are two places that come to my mind in particular.

va 4GER: What are the benefits of meditation to managing stress?

VA: Scientific case studies carried out at the Emory University, USA, indicate that compassionate meditation enhances our mental and physical well-being. It creates greater connectedness amongst members of the society and thereby reduces the stress levels. I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Lobsang Tenzin Negi, director of the Emory-Tibet Partnership at the university when he was on a visit to Delhi. He pointed out that meditation is an antidote to stress. It does the exact opposite of what stress does to your body. Stress aggravates your adrenalin levels, meditation brings it down, stress shoots up your blood pressure, meditation controls it, stress stretches your nerves and meditation calms them. 

Meditating on compassion that is, love for all, is enormously beneficial in fighting stress.

Indeed compassion is a basic human value and need not be practiced in the context of any particular religion. Meditation helps us to develop this positive emotion within ourselves

All these positive emotions, reared through regular meditation, have great beneficial impact on our health. Becoming kind from within changes our behavior towards others and this in turn makes others around us kinder in return.

GER: You wrote a piece, Women on the Path: The Transnational Sangha’, Awakening Buddhist Women, share with us your thoughts on the awakening? VA: 

“Free am I, oh so free am I
Being freed
By means of the three crooked things:
The mortar, pestle, and my crooked husband! “
                                                Therigatha 11
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This is one of the verses written by a female disciple of the Buddha more than 2500 years ago. The lines epitomize the sense of freedom which spiritual awakening brings into women’s lives who otherwise find themselves in the suffocating grind of domestic life 24×7. The message is as relevant today as it was all those years ago because basically, nothing has changed.
 
In the quest for enlightenment, men and women are equal. Emancipation is a matter of the heartso why should it matter whether the individual who seeks it is a man or a woman? In reality however, women face many obstacles in their endeavors towards self-realizationmore, perhaps, than in any other area of their lives.
 
 
My paper on Awakening Buddhist Women took an in-depth view of the worldwide efforts being made by women to seek a quality space for themselves. It included case studies of women on the spiritual path from different socio-economic, cultural and geographical backgrounds.
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GER: Tell us about the poetry scene in your home town and in India at this point in time?

VA: Oh it’s rife with creativity and inspired writing! Of course you have the section of bad poets who write mediocre stuff and pass it off as art! But India does have its share of brilliant poets who’ve been published internationally, whose work has been evaluated by editors of world class journals accepted, published and occasionally even glorified.

That is very heartening to all aspiring and upcoming poets! It sets a benchmark of good writing standards and chisels ambitions to a fine tip. 

Most cities organize poetry readings and literary festivals that provide a good platform for poetic interactions and also a good exposure for one’s writing. So many literary journals have mushroomed in the country! I just wish that the better ones amongst them continue to maintain a good standard of writing. 

I must also mention here the amazing strength and depth of regional literature in India. My country has over 700 languages! So you can imagine the range of literature that sprouts from different corners of the country. It’s quite fascinating.

GER: Do you perform your poetry and if so what are the benefits to reading in front of a live audience?

SAARC Literature Festival at DelhiVA: Yes I do. In fact I love doing live readings. It gives you an opportunity to connect with the pulse of your readers. Gives you instant feedback about your work and the joy of seeing your words settle in people’s hearts. The experience is quite matchless!

I’ve had youngsters approach me with endearing trepidation after my readings asking if they could keep in touch with me…I’ve had older, established poets come forth and comment on what they see as strengths in my poetry. These are all the delightful fall outs of live readings!

Also, when you read live, you portray not just your work but the entire ethos to which you belong. The way you dress, the way you carry yourself and the way you interact with fellow poets also helps to convey your sensibilities as a poet. It’s a wholesome experience that goes beyond the scope of mere words.

GER: What projects are you currently working on?

VA: As a poet, I have two manuscripts ready for publication. A couple of publishers have approached me but I am yet to make up my mind about how to go about it. I also want to bring out my collection of very short poems. You will probably see a lot of me in 2015 – I hope that’s a good thing! 

I’m also helping one of my very dear colleagues to organize a top quality literary fest in the spring of 2015. Hopefully it will turn out to be one of its kind! 

On the research front, I’m in the process of writing a book about Buddha’s journey from Bodh Gaya to Sarnath i.e. from his place of enlightenment to the place where he gave his very first sermon. The book is titled Two Full Moons. But it’s in its nascent stages as of now because it requires immense and intense research and my avenues are limited. 

In general, poetry keeps me in its grip all the time. Like I said earlier, it’s a malaise…but with a sweet, dervish-like sting to it.

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You can read the poetry of Vinita Agrawal in The Fox Chase Review at these links: http://www.foxchasereview.org/12AW/VinitaAgrawal.html http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/s14vagrawal.html

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2nd-saturday-poets-1-21-12-guarnieri-reutter-readiing-017-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA) https://gereutter.wordpress.com/

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Poetry Everywhere

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Poetry Everywhere over at the Poetry Foundation is worth a look and a listen to numerous poets reading their work.

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/features/video?show=Poetry%20Everywhere

The New York Times remembers Seamus Heaney

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Seamus Heaney in his own voice

http://www.nytimes.com/video/arts/100000002414053/seamus-heaney-1939-2013.html?ref=poetryandpoets

10 Questions for Linda Nemec Foster

LindaPortrait2009- Photo Courtesy of Robert TurneyLinda Nemec Foster graduated magna cum laude from Aquinas College and received her M.F.A. from Goddard College. From 1980-2002, she taught poetry workshops for the Michigan Creative-Writers-in-Schools Program.

Foster is the author of nine collections of poetry: A History of the Body (Coffee House Press, 1987); A Modern Fairy Tale: The Baba Yaga Poems (Ridgeway Press, 1992); Trying to Balance the Heart (Sun Dog Press, 1993); Living in the Fire Nest (Ridgeway Press, 1996) which was a finalist for the Poet’s Prize; Contemplating the Heavens (Ridgeway Press, 2001); Amber Necklace from Gdansk (Louisiana State University Press, 2001) which was a finalist for the Ohioana Book Award in Poetry; Listen to the Landscape (Eerdmans Publishing, 2006) which was short-listed for the Michigan Notable Book Award; Ten Songs from Bulgaria (Cervena Barva Press, 2008); and Talking Diamonds (New Issues Press, 2009) which was a finalist for ForeWord Magazine’s 2010 Book of the Year in Poetry.

Over 300 of her poems have appeared in various magazines and journals. In 1997 she founded the Contemporary Writers Series (CWS) at Aquinas College and currently is a member of the Series’ programming committee.  You can visit her at: http://www.lindanemecfoster.com/

TalkingDiamonds-Cover

GER: Tell us about your latest release Talking Diamonds and the inspiration behind the development of the collection.

LNF:  Talking Diamonds was published in 2009 by New Issues Poetry & Prose    (sponsored by Western Michigan University) and was the culmination of six years of writing the poems and sequencing the collection.  During most of that time, the title was different but the theme of the manuscript was always the same:  death, loss, faith, doubt, and the strong redemptive effect of art on the human psyche.  From the first poem, “The Field Behind the Dying Father’s House,” to the last, “Trinity,” there is a progression of imagery and metaphor that speaks to the life journeys we all experience.  The book is divided into three parts:  the first section deals with death and loss; the second part deals with how the landscapes we live in influence our sense of transitions; and the final section is devoted to ekphrastic poems–all the poems are inspired by visual art.  During the time I was drafting and revising the manuscript, I was dealing with a number of losses in my life–including the declining health of my father.  He died two months before the book was published.  That experience (and others) really influenced my creative process and the poems I was writing at the time.  When I started sending the collection out for publication, I actually thought that no editor would be interested because of its somber tone but I couldn’t (and wouldn’t) “lighten it up.”  When New Issues Press accepted the manuscript in the spring of 2008, editor William Olsen was impressed with its distinctive voice and lack of guile:  in other words, I was correct to follow my instincts and not try to “re-work” the poems.  Olsen also saw the collection as being more about transformation than strictly loss.  He suggested the book’s title from one of the poems that reflected this theme and it was “Talking Diamonds.”  I’m indebted to his careful and diligent reading of my work.

linda nemec foster 2GER: You have a long history of conducting workshops for poets. What are the benefits to the poets who attend and the benefits to you?

LNF: I’ve taught creative writing workshops for over 30 years.  From 1980-2002, I was very involved with the Creative-Writers-in-the-Schools sponsored by the Michigan Council for the Arts and Cultural Affairs.  This program placed poets and writers in K-12 schools (both public and private) throughout the state of Michigan in residencies that lasted anywhere from several days to several months.  On the average, I would do 3-5 residencies in an academic year.  I loved interacting with the students (especially in grades 4-12); their enthusiasm and interest were infectious and always inspired my own work in the process.  The most memorable workshop I conducted during those years was in the spring of 1996.  I spent a week at an elementary school in Grand Rapids (with 3rd and 4th graders) where most of the student population were either Hispanic or African-American.  In the middle of that week, there was an after-school shooting in the playground.  Miraculously, no one was killed or seriously injured but it did “shake-up” the city.  This incident really gave my students in the poetry workshops a sense of purpose when they came to school the next day.  They all wanted to write about the incident; I channeled that desire to focus not on guns and violence but on their sense of identity in the community.  It was such a positive experience that the Grand Rapids Press did a major two-page article on the workshops.  I’ve also taught on the college level as an adjunct professor and guest lecturer on quite a number of campuses in the Midwest and elsewhere.  And I’ve lead community workshops for adults in art centers, libraries, museums, and galleries.  The most satisfying was a Master Level class I taught in 1999 at the Detroit Institute of the Arts:  I was awarded a teaching fellowship by the National Writer’s Voice (sponsored by their NYC office) to conduct an advanced poetry workshop.  The theme of the workshop was ekphrastic poetry and I used the exhibits at the Institute as springboards to assign the poetry exercises.  There were only nine participants–all women–who had gone through a competitive submission process to be accepted for the program.  As the semester progressed, I realized they were all fine writers who wrote  poetry that inspired my own writing–every exercise I gave them, I also did.  Several of these former students have gone on to win awards and publish books.  Nothing is more satisfying for a teacher.

GER: You have received a number of awards and grants. How important was it to your writing career to have received such recognition?

LNF: When I was at Goddard College studying for my MFA in creative writing, one of my teachers and mentors Stephen Dobyns had a discussion with me about awards, grants, etc.  His advice was not to be obsessed with winning recognition–just keep focused on the work.  But I have to admit, it is a wonderful feeling to get accolades for  your poetry.  My books have been finalists for the Ohio Book Award (Amber Necklace from Gdansk), ForeWord Magazine’s Book of the Year (Talking Diamonds), Michigan Notable Book Award (Listen to the Landscape), and the Poet’s Prize from the Roerich Museum (Living in the Fire Nest).  My work has also received awards from the Arts Foundation of Michigan, ArtServe Michigan, the National Writer’s Voice, and the Academy of American Poets, among others.  I was also selected to be the first Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Probably the most notable recognition was winning the Creative Arts Award from the Polish American Historical Association.  The award was presented to me at a ceremony at the Polish Embassy in Washington, D.C.  The fact that all four of my grandparents immigrated to America from Poland made this award particularly significant.  I felt honored and humbled–as if the legacy of my family was also recognized.  Obviously, it is wonderful to have these kinds of affirmations for my poetry.  But, after all is said and done, Dobyns was right.  It really is the work that ultimately matters.  Without it, there really can’t be anything else.

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GER: A large body of your work has been published. Where do you get the inspiration for your poems? What is your process of crafting each one?

LNF: Another teacher of mine, Ken Mikolowski at Wayne State University, once told the  class that “anything can be poetry, not everything is.”  In other words, anything you experience can become the inspiration for a poem.  The difficult work is transforming that experience–with a unique voice and vision–into a poem that can be accessible to the reader/listener yet can maintain a palpable mystery in its core.  I have gained my inspiration from family tragedies to strangers’ random conversations I overhear in restaurants, from crass tabloid headlines to extraordinary works of art.  Anything is possible and everything should be on the table.  Regarding my process, when I write a poem I always start by writing in longhand.  I go through 5-10 drafts on yellow legal notepads before I continue to draft and revise on the computer.  That’s when I see the shape of the poem as the line breaks, stanza breaks, and general form can be visualized.  In my process, the content comes first and then the form.  But both have to work as seamless, intertwined entities for a poem to truly become a unique vision.  It’s the ultimate balancing act.  “Without a net,” as another mentor joked.

Amber NecklaceGER: Tell us about your collection Amber Necklace  and the inspiration behind the collection.

LNF: Amber Necklace from Gdansk was published in 2001 by Louisiana State University Press.  This full-length collection of poems was inspired by my Polish-American heritage and the first visit to my family’s homeland in 1996.  The book reflects on the immigrant experiences of my grandparents–an experience of loss and discovery, of ambivalence and pride, of deep tragedy and redemption.  My own ethnicity as the daughter of second-generation immigrants from Poland is colored by America’s somewhat disinterested view of the “other” Europe–only recently emerged from history’s dark shadow–and of a country that for over a hundred years did not exist as a political entity on a map.  In the book’s opening poem, “The Awkward Young Girl Approaching You,” I struggle with this sense of ethnic identity:      “Who will speak for the dispossessed,/those who come from nowhere,/whose birthplace cannot be found/on any map…?”    My attempts to reclaim an ethnic heritage, to search for myself in the mirror of my family’s history, resonate throughout the poems.  Divided into four parts and employing a variety of styles and forms, the collection moves from lyric childhood memories and descriptions of immigrant life to prose poems that interweave the mythic past with the present.  Amber Necklace from Gdansk captures the sense of loss that can still permeate Poland–from Chopin’s self-exile, to the silence of rain, to the overwhelming horror of the Holocaust–and concludes with a group of poems that reveals resilience in the face of a haunted past and an iconoclastic present.  I have been back to visit Poland six times since 1996, but that first trip was truly a significant touchstone in my life and an amazing wellspring of inspiration for my writing.  It is my hope this book is a testament to the land, history, and culture of my ancestors.

GER: What poets do you read and who are your favorites?

LNF: I have a long list of poets who are my favorites:  Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Dylan Thomas, William Shakespeare, Rainer Maria Rilke, Lisel Mueller, Seamus Heaney, Phil Levine, Stephen Dobyns, Ellen Bryant Voigt, Heather McHugh, Li-Young Lee, Linda Pastan, Marilyn Nelson, Linda Hogan, Czeslaw Milosz, Zbigniew Herbert, Wislawa Szymborska, Adam Zagajewski.  The list can go on and on.  Extraordinary, rich, and diverse voices that I read again and again to make some sense of this world and my place in it.

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GER: What advice would you give emerging poets on the submission process?

LNF: Have a thick skin!  The submission process is very competitive.  When you consider that some magazines and journals accept less than 5% of the work submitted, you can understand how many poets compare the whole process to a lottery system.  Book publishing (and I’m not talking about self-publishing) is also challenging.  Very good resources for submissions are the regular columns in Poets & Writers Magazine and the annual publication of The International Directory of Little Magazines and Small Presses.  The latter resource is excellent for emerging poets since it gives them a good sense of editors and who, what, and why they publish.  In the submission process, patience and persistence are sometimes just as important as talent.  It demands time and energy–a different kind of energy that is used in the creative process–but you just have to stick with it.  Do your homework.  Read and research those publications you’d like to submit to.  If you’re  just starting out, don’t submit work to The New Yorker.  Concentrate on those publications that are open to and encourage new and emerging poets.

GER: How important is it to you as a poet to share your work with audiences at poetry readings?

LNF: Let’s be honest:  being a poet can be a lonely profession.  The creating, crafting, and revising of poems demand concentration, time, energy, and discipline.  For me, it is very important to “get out into the world” and share my work with audiences on a regular basis.  Some poets don’t like to give readings and/or are not very good at public presentations.  I’ve heard some famous poets give awkward, poor readings and some relatively unknown poets give wonderful readings.  The bottom line is that a poem should be strong on the page and in the voice.  After all, poetry started as a purely oral tradition long before the invention of paper, the letterpress, or the laptop.  

LindaNemecFoster-3GER: Tell us about the poetry scene in Michigan in particular various reading series.

LNF: There are several very fine reading series in Michigan.  The one that I am most familiar with is the Contemporary Writers Series at Aquinas College in Grand Rapids.  I founded the Series (along with my husband) in 1997 and we have hosted some of the finest poets and writers:  Seamus Heaney, Michael Ondaatje, Peter Carey, Li-Young Lee, Scott Turow, Thomas Lynch, Lisel Mueller, Maxine Kumin, Linda Pastan, Linda Hogan, Joy Harjo, Quincy Troupe, David Mura, Clarence Major, etc.  Every academic year, we bring in 4 authors–two in the fall semester and two in the spring–and our audience averages around 200 per event.  Seamus Heaney broke the attendance record in May of 2006 when he read for over 640 poetry lovers.  It was a memorable night, especially when he told me after his reading that he thought the Contemporary Writers Series was one of the best reading series in the country.  Here is a link to the CWS website.  http://www.aquinas.edu/cw/index.html   I’d like to list five other series that deserve mention:  the Jack Ridl Visiting Writers Series at Hope College (Holland); the Gwen Frostic Reading Series at Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo); the program coordinated by Robert Fanning at Central Michigan University (Mt. Pleasant); the Hopwood Reading Series at the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor); and the wonderful events hosted and organized by M.L. Liebler that take place throughout the Detroit area.  Last month, Poets & Writers invited me to write an article for their blog about one of the events in Detroit.  Here’s the link.  http://www.pw.org/content/linda_nemec_foster_ All of these programs attest to a lively and thriving poetry scene.

GER: What projects are you currently working on?

LNF:Earlier this year, I finished a collaboration with Hungarian musician Laszlo Slomovits.  This project had its beginnings when I first viewed the work of photographer Jacko Vassilev.  His portfolio, “The Dance of Zlatio Zlatev,” appeared in Harper’s Magazine and gave visual testimony to the impoverished and marginalized people of Eastern Europe.  Vassilev’s haunting portraits inspired me to write a sequence of poems, Ten Songs from Bulgaria, that was published by Cervena Barva Press in 2008.  The next step in this process occurred in 2011 when Slomovits read the chapbook and was immediately drawn to the poems as lyrics for original songs.  He began composing ten pieces to correspond to the ten poems:  our CD, Cry of Freedom, is the result of this partnership of art, poetry, and music.  It was released in 2013.  Michigan Public Radio (an affiliate of NPR) invited us into the studio for an interview.  Here’s the link. http://michiganradio.org/post/bulgarian-photography-and-michigan-poetry-inspire-album  Also, I am currently working on a new manuscript of prose poems, Fragments.

You can read the poetry of Linda Nemec Foster in The Fox Chase Review at this link: http://www.foxchasereview.org/13AW/Foster.html

g emil reutter-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. (USA)

http://gereutter.wordpress.com/