Tag Archives: poetry

Esposito and McClung Welcome Summer to Ryerss

Featured Poets Laren McClung and Lynette Esposito

Featured Poets Laren McClung and Lynette Esposito

Memorial Day Weekend is the unofficial start of summer and Poets Lynette Esposito and Laren McClung warmed up the old mansion at Ryerss. The featured poets were followed in the open mic by Louise Sprouse, Wendy Schermer, Norman Lampert, Ethyl Treatman Burns and Rodger Lowenthal.

You can see photographs of the event at this link: https://www.flickr.com/photos/12065560@N04/sets/72157629096910438

Next up: Poets on the Porch 2015 July 11th @ 1 p.m.

RIP Franz Wright 1953–2015

franz-wright

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2015/05/15/franz-wright-waltham-pulitzer-prize-winning-poet-dies/kkYxHZXge3tsxS87EmDx4O/story.html

.

http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/franz-wright

Poets Esposito and McClung in Fox Chase May 23rd

Lynette Esposito

Lynette Esposito

Lauren McClung

Laren McClung

Join us in the 2nd floor gallery of Ryerss Museum and Library at 1 p.m. for the poetry of Lynette Esposito and Laren McClung. The featured poets will be followed by an open mic. Ryerss is located atop the hill at Burholme Park, 7370 Central Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa. 19111. For more information visit: https://foxchasereview.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/esposito-and-mcclung-in-fox-chase-may-23rd/

Philadelphia Mayoral Candidates on the Arts – Vote May 19th

Philadelphia City Hall '08

-g emil reutter

On May 1st we sent out eight questions to the Mayoral candidates in Philadelphia concerning the arts. Questions concerned the poet laureate program, funding for museum/homes in Fairmount Park, questions about what books the candidates have read, visits to the art museum, who are their favorite poet/writers and artists. We requested the candidates respond by May 10th. We included all the Democrat candidates and the Republican candidate for the May 19th primary. Responses appear below in the order they have been returned. Those not responding appear at the bottom of the post. Remember to vote May 19th!

Anthony Williams courtesy Williams Campaign

Anthony Williams – Democrat, Philadelphia

https://www.anthonyhwilliams.com/about/

As Mayor would you continue the Poet Laureate position in Philadelphia?

Absolutely. As Poet Laureates, Sonia Sanchez and Frank Sherlock showcase the best of what Philadelphia has to offer. We should continue it, and highlight Philadelphia as a city that recognizes arts and culture as one of city’s strategic assets.

In recent years funding for the arts has substantially decreased. What is your position of funding of the arts and would you increase city funding?

.

As Mayor, I will elevate city government’s commitment to the arts by creating a Department of Arts, Culture, and Creative Economy. I will also commit to securing a dedicated revenue stream for the arts, as a part of a long­term strategic vision for how the sector can accelerate economic growth for artists and organizations alike.

.

The museum/homes of Fairmount Park are jewels of the city. What would you do as Mayor to insure proper funding and maintenance of these homes visited by the public?

.

I’m committed to increasing the operating and capital budgets for the Department of Parks and Recreation. Underfunding the basic capital needs of parks and recreation is short sighted. Thirteen percent of Philadelphia is parkland. Philadelphia has one of the top 5 highest total acreages of park land in the nation, and we spend less than almost every city to maintain it. This is to our detriment: the city’s parks generate over $40M in increased equity for homeowners that live near them. With a focus on strong programming in museums and homes in Fairmount Park, we can attract neighborhood revitalization, engage families, and activate community pride.

Who is your favorite poet/writer and why?

TS Elliott in high school, grew to love novels of James Baldwin and poetry of Nicki Giovanni in college- has an eclectic set of tastes in poetry and prose. 

Who is your favorite artist and why?

Henry Ossawa Tanner 

When was the last occasion you paid a visit to the Art Museum?

Art museum visit :  for official business but not in a while for pleasure, but visited the Barnes in 2014 with wife Shari, just before I started running for mayor

How many books do you read during the course of a year?

Reads at least 2 books a month

Do you have a personal passion for the arts and if so what discipline do you engage?

Has personal passion for the arts based upon discovering this was the best format to learn; arts and sports was what kept my attention in high school, that’s why I am so frustrated by the fact that the arts have largely disappeared from public schools, it is the only thing that motivates some kids to stay in school? Favorite discipline is music…loves to dance. 

doug oliver- courtesy of oliver campagin

Doug Oliver- Democrat, Philadelphia

http://dougoliver2015.com/who-am-i/

As Mayor would you continue the Poet Laureate position in Philadelphia?

Certainly. Our city has a rich history and exciting future rooted in written and spoken word. Those who have served in the official capacity – Sonia Sanchez and Frank Sherlock – as well as those who have served as unofficial cultural ambassadors like The Roots, Jill Scott, Linda Creed, Kenny Gamble & Leon Huff and dating as far back as Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Allen Poe and our founding Father Benjamin Franklin … all of these amazing writers and poets have lent to the depth of our cultural richness and helped to put the city on the map.

Now, through the launch of the Youth Poet Laureate program and our city hosting the Brave New Voices International Youth Poetry Festival last year, spoken word has also emerged as a way to connect to the youth in our city, allowing their voices to be heard. Preserving the Poet Laureate position is a relatively small investment that renders massive tangible and intangible benefits for our city and our cultural economy. And even during times when tough decisions on our budget may have to be made, I think we could look to public/private partnerships to support and even expand the program. I applaud the Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy for its work.

In recent years funding for the arts has substantially decreased. What is your position of funding of the arts and would you increase city funding?

Tourism has a $10 billion impact on the overall economy of the Philadelphia region. One of the most important draws for the more than 30 million visitors to the region each year is the strength of our arts and culture community. Much of that traffic has been confined to the many fine institutions in Center City. In our Beyond the Bell strategy, we look to expand the benefits of the tourism industry to our culturally rich neighborhoods.

One way we can support this is to increase targeted investment in thriving multicultural “Main Streets,” extending the same Business Improvement Districts that brought life to the Avenue of the Arts and University City into other neighborhoods. I would also like to consider strategies for bringing the Uptown Theater back into commerce and using it as a catalytic project that would spur growth along North Broad Street. We would also like to implement a tourism district “Round it Up” program for local businesses, offering customers an opportunity to designate their leftover change to our City’s Cultural Fund. Additionally, I would like to look at working with The Philadelphia Fund and the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance on our city’s participation in Give Local America!, a national online single day of giving event that has worked well in Pittsburgh and New Orleans to spur individual donor support of our cultural institutions and other non-profit organizations.

The museum/homes of Fairmount Park are jewels of the city. What would you do as Mayor to insure proper funding and maintenance of these homes visited by the public?

Many of these history buildings date back to the centennial exhibition of 1876. Fairmount Park has some of the greatest architectural gems of any parks system in the country. I believe these capital projects require strong public/private partnerships between the philanthropic community and city government. I also believe in adaptive reuse of many of these historic buildings like the Please Touch Museum and Ryerss Mansion at Burholme Park.

Who is your favorite poet/writer and why?

Maya Angelou. Her life. The richness of her words. Her ability to persevere through incredible adversity, translate her pain into prose that have helped uplift generations of readers – across all walks of life – to become one of the greatest writers of our time is inspiring.

Who is your favorite artist and why?

I would have to say both Norman Rockwell and Gordon Parks. Both had a way of capturing their respective views of the American experience and every day life in ways that were both relatable and impactful.

When was the last occasion you paid a visit to the Art Museum?

It’s been a while since I’ve able to make it to the Art Museum. But the incredible thing about Philadelphia is that we are home to a rich, diverse collection of repositories for the arts. I recently visited the African American Museum of Art in Philadelphia for the opening of the exhibition Badass Art Man: Original Work of Danny Simmons.

How many books do you read during the course of a year?

10 to 15. I try to get in one a month.

Do you have a personal passion for the arts and if so what discipline do you engage?

I used to play the trumpet. One of the defining moments in my life was when I was student at Pickett Middle School and some guys stole my trumpet and broke it. I haven’t played since. However, I still remain extremely passionate about the Arts. There’s been a lot of focus placed on STEM industries – science, technology, engineering and math – as economic drivers. I’m in support of STEAM – those same disciplines with an added emphasis on the Arts. Some of our greatest assets are the many cultural institutions throughout our city. I believe it is important for us to include those institutions in conversations around preparing our children for the future, developing unique job and small business opportunities and ultimately building out a stronger and more diverse economy in our City.

jim kenney courtesy Kenney campaign

Jim Kenney- Democrat, Philadelphia

https://kenney2015.com/about

As Mayor would you continue the Poet Laureate position in Philadelphia?

Yes

In recent years funding for the arts has substantially decreased. What is your position of funding of the arts and would you increase city funding?

Yes through partnerships with corporations and large non-profits. Increasing access to the arts in to engaging our students and they will be a key part of my plan to expand the community school model throughout Philadelphia. schools are critical.

The museum/homes of Fairmount Park are jewels of the city. What would you do as Mayor to insure proper funding and maintenance of these homes visited by the public?

Private-public partnerships will be critical. I am dedicated to being a constant advocate for these and other cultural jewels that contribute invaluably to our tourism and local economy.

Who is your favorite poet/writer and why?

Langston Hughes, very lyrical

Who is your favorite artist and why?

Atkins, a Philly artist who despite an underprivileged childhood went on to achieve great things and give back tremendously to his community.

When was the last occasion you paid a visit to the Art Museum?

Last year for a benefit to support the museum

How many books do you read during the course of a year?

4-5

Do you have a personal passion for the arts and if so what discipline do you engage?

I participated in the New Year’s parade for many years, but these days I mostly just sing showtunes.

Nelson Diaz courtesy Diaz fro Mayor

Nelson Diaz- Democrat, Philadelphia

http://www.nelsondiazformayor.com/meet-nelson

As Mayor would you continue the Poet Laureate position in Philadelphia?

Yes I would. This is an important symbolic token of our support for the creative arts in Philadelphia, and I look forward to helping to select our third Poet Laureate as Mayor.

In recent years funding for the arts has substantially decreased. What is your position of funding of the arts and would you increase city funding?

The City should invest more in the arts and in parks because doing so would yield huge dividends for the city, on a financial as well as a cultural level. I’d much rather invest in the arts than in sports stadiums, for instance, because the arts generate so much more for our city than a stadium does. The arts are one of the key drivers of our economy and deserve our enthusiastic support as a city government.

The museum/homes of Fairmount Park are jewels of the city. What would you do as Mayor to insure proper funding and maintenance of these homes visited by the public?

City funding for our parks should be increased. I’ve repeatedly gone on record during this campaign pledging to increase city support for our parks department and invest more resources in maintaining and expanding parks and green space across our City.

Who is your favorite poet/writer and why?

My favorite author is Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Not just for her legal opinions, but for her inspiring and powerful memoir. As a fellow Puerto Rican from public housing in New York, I found it particularly meaningful to read her journey.

Who is your favorite artist and why?

Picasso. I’ve had the privilege of seeing his work around the world and always found it amazing.

When was the last occasion you paid a visit to the Art Museum?

I’m actually a member of the Board of Trustees of the Art Museum; I visit frequently, and was there a month ago for a presentation on the African American collection.

How many books do you read during the course of a year?

On average I read four books a year for pleasure and a number more for business and corporate law or governance.

Do you have a personal passion for the arts and if so what discipline do you engage?

I am a particular fan of dance and music, and enjoy salsa dancing. While my form is a little unorthodox, I make up for it with enthusiasm.

—————————————————————————————————-

No Response

Lynne Abraham

Melissa Murray Bailey

T Milton Street

 

.

g-g emil reutter lives and writes in the Fox Chase neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pa. He can be found at: https://gereutter.wordpress.com/about/

The Fox Chase Review

Fox_Chase_Review__2__400x400

For current and past issues of The Fox Chase Review please visit http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/

Winter Stars by Larry Levis

winter stars 2Series: Pitt Poetry Series

Paperback: 104 pages

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press; 1 edition (March 31, 1985)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 0822953684

ISBN-13: 978-0822953685

.

Reviewed by Stephen (S. M.) Page.

When I wake I sip coffee and I am suddenly inspired to add a few more pages to my current poetry project, the verse play (or play-poem, a term I coined, I think).  Then I take a shower and decide I need to get out the house.  I have been inside for almost 48 hours.  I check the weather channel on the net and see that it is 97 degrees outside–with humidity.  I dress accordingly.  I put on a short sleeve linen shirt, linen shorts, leather sandals, a cotton baseball cap.  In the elevator I feel a trickle of sweat run down by belly from my chest.  The street smells of melting tar and car exhaust.  Buses rev their engines and taxis honk.  Angry drivers yell and swear at each other.  I walk quickly as I can to the Village Recoleta Cinemas, an air-conditioned, five-floor twenty-theater complex with seven restaurants, two cafés, a bookstore, a music store, and an ice-cream parlor on the middle floor.  Village Recoleta has the cleanest, coolest, best-view-seating theaters in the city.  Besides that, it’s the only cinema house that has numbered seats, so I can buy my ticket early and stroll in at the last minute and my seat will be open.  There’s no mad rush to get a good seat.  The movie I bought a ticket for does not start for one hour and fifteen minutes, so I take the elevator to the third floor, get in line at the MacDonald’s stand, order a MacNifica combo and leisurely eat it while seated in a chair by the window.  I watch the people walk by on the street.  I check the girls out in their summer dresses and sandaled feet.  I pick out a couple of people going by and watch them, note their dress, their walking style, their idiosyncrasies, and I try to imagine what they are thinking, what their speech mannerisms are, what their lifestyle is, where they are going.  Then I go to the Coffee Store (which is a chain store but has some of the best tasting coffee in the city) and order a cortado—that’s a small coffee cut with milk (Coffees in Argentina are smaller and more concentrated than in the United States.  No tall lattes here, and especially no non-fat cinnamon mocha Frappuccinoes.  The cups are espresso size and approximately the same strength. A customer has the choices of coffee, coffee with milk, and cappuccino.  Argentines are proud of their coffee and their cafés, but a connoisseur needs to shop around because some cafés have great coffee but bad ambience, and some have great ambience but bad coffee—really bad.  Some cafés are good for reading and writing; some are good for watching people.  After seven years here I am pretty much set in the places I like to frequent, but I always keep my eyes open.  Whenever I am about the city and I see a café that I have never been too, I usually stop in and give it a try.  It’s kind of an adventure for me).  After my coffee I stroll into the music store and after a little browsing, I find a CD I never heard before, ‘Jerry Mulligan with Strings.’  I wander to the concession stand and order a large bag of popcorn and a bottle of mineral water, then I casually ride the escalator up to room 16 on the top floor.  I hand my ticket to the ticket taker, enter the dark theater and take my seat just as the Spiderman 3 trailer is ending.  The movie I watch is ‘Hollywoodland,’ which is not especially great.  What weakens the movie are stock characters and clichéd dialogue.  It doesn’t matter that much to me, if I see a good movie I see a good movie (like Erice’s ‘Spirit of the Beehive’) and I feel enlightened, lucky.  I used to be a real movie snob, watching only art films, Sundance-type films, foreign films.  I’ve walked out of theatres in the middle of a movie about a thousand times the last decade or so, whenever a main character became stock, the language clichéd, the actions unbelievable.  Sometime last year I changed.  If I see a not-so-good movie, well: so what.  It’s the action of going to the cinema that I like, the experience, the visceral, sitting in my favorite seat in the sixth row of the middle section along the aisle, munching popcorn and watching the characters move on the big screen above me.  Monday is my movie day.  I usually find an excuse to slip away from home on Monday and see a movie alone.  I often go to the matinees because they are cheaper and there is hardly anyone in the theaters.  Anyway, after the movie I return home and eat dinner, then I unwrap Larry Levis’ Winter Stars, which just arrived that afternoon by DHL courier (it cost me 43 bucks, 12.95 for the book and the rest for shipping, so it better be good Timothy Liu).  It’s not at all good: it’s outstanding.  I especially like the first two poems, ‘The Poet at Seventeen’ and ‘Adolescence’.  The poems are devastatingly surprising, the language fresh, the imagery sharp.  In ‘Poet at 17’ Levis captures well the energetic recklessness and immortal feeling of youth, and juxtaposes it in perfect contrast to the fearful stasis of adulthood.  I notice by the second poem the idiosyncratic use of & for and.  I didn’t notice it at first, so he employs it naturally and stamps himself into the poems.  In all of the poems, Levis has a way of writing about himself but connecting to the reader.  He is an extremely gifted poet.   By the time I get to the end of the book I am exhausted and I fall asleep.

You can find the book here: http://www.amazon.com/Winter-Stars-Poetry-Larry-Levis/dp/0822953684/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8

Stephen (S. M.) Page in a cafe writing ready to go see a movie– Stephen (S.M.) Page is from the Motor City. He is part Shawnee and part Apache.  He loves to take long walks, watch movies, read, and write.

 

 

Congratulations to Russell Reece

Russell Reece

FCR’s fiction editor, Russell Reece who is a writer of short stories and poetry was recently honored by the Delaware Press Association Annual Communications Contest placing first. The poem, Spring at Dames Quarter, was published here in The Fox Chase Review: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/w14rreece.html

mud lake

Russ’s collection, Mud Lake Trilogy, was also honored with a 2nd place award.  http://www.amazon.com/Mud-Lake-Trilogy-Russell-Reece/dp/0692025472/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8