Quaker Diner – Time to Revisit an Old Friend

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7241 Rising Sun Ave Philadelphia, PA 19111‎

(215) 745-5055 – Open 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Quaker-Diner/169523603102287

-g emil reutter

IMG_1437Businesses come and go but The Quaker Diner has been around since the 1930’s and family owned since the 1970’s. The Diner has just made a major commitment to the community with a major renovation of the outside of the diner and are currently completing a renovation of the interior. It is the kind of place the hipsters in Fishtown wished they had only it is not retro, it is original. IMG_1441 We stopped in for a late evening breakfast and were delighted with the friendly service and neighborhood feel to the place while we talked and listened to other customers. The banter was outstanding and the waitress was on the ball. The diner is clean and orderly and have a great take out section of baked items made on the premises. IMG_1443

Our breakfast order was dished up quickly and ample helpings were provided and quite tasty. The coffee was also outstanding.

If you looking for that great American diner experience, The Quaker Diner is a must visit.   Also of note, right next door to the diner, Chase’s Hop Shop is slated to open with craft beer and sandwiches. With affordable housing and apartments, convenient to train and bus lines, the folks in Fishtown may move up to Lawndale and Burholme. After all it is only 15 minutes by train to Center City and there is The Quaker Diner.  IMG_1444

Poetry in the News

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Egyptian poet Abnoudi dies at 76

http://www.middleeasteye.net/news/legendary-egyptian-poet-abdel-rahman-al-abnoudi-dies-76-1077039163

Interview with The Poet

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-malik/interview-with-the-poet_b_7096066.html

BOA poet wins Israel ‘Nobel’ Prize

http://www.democratandchronicle.com/story/lifestyle/art/blogs/

community/2015/04/21/boa-poet-wins-israel-nobel-prize/26122187/

At 84, Poet Gary Snyder Lives In ‘This Present Moment’

http://www.npr.org/2015/04/18/400573636/at-84-poet-gary-snyder-lives-in-this-present-moment

Poet laureate Natasha Trethewey signals start of Sandburg Festival

http://www.galesburg.com/article/20150422/NEWS/150429917

The 50 Best American Poetry Books of the Decade so Far

http://flavorwire.com/515268/the-50-best-american-poetry-books-of-the-decade-so-far

Willingboro native wins Pulitzer for poetry

http://www.burlingtoncountytimes.com/news/local/willingboro-native-wins-pulitzer-for-poetry/article_96205a5d-1a2d-5dcb-a216-e716eb3cab28.html

It’s National Poetry Month and You Haven’t Read a Single Poem Yet, Have You?

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/121543/its-national-poetry-month-and-you-havent-read-single-poem-yet

Mohammed al-Ajami Still in Prison

We are all Tunisians (Tunisian Jasmine)*

Mr. Prime Minister Mohamed al-Ghannoushi
You don’t hold constitutional power
We don’t wax nostalgic for Ben Ali or his times
For us that’s past history
The dictatorship of a despotic and oppressive regime
Against which the people have raised their revolutionary voice
We only criticize the disgrace and the horror
And when we praise somebody it’s only because of our personal convictions
Oh revolutionary hail the struggle with the blood of the people
Carve the value of rebellion in the soul of the free
And tell those who are holding their shroud
That every victory bears its ordeals
Ah, when shall it be the turn of that country whose foolish king
Believes he can rely on the American military
Ah, when shall it be the turn of the country whose people are empty bellied
While its government time and again praises the growth of finance?
Ah, when shall it be the turn of the country where you go to sleep a citizen
And you wake up stateless the next morning?
Ah, when shall it be the turn of that repressive and hereditary regime?
Until when shall you remain a slave to selfishness?
Until when shall the people remain unaware of its value
And fail to choose its own government?
Enough with tyrannical regimes!
Tell the one who torment his people
That tomorrow someone else will take his place
He should not rest assured that the country belongs to him or his offspring
Because the country belongs to the people and so does glory
Join your voices in a chorus for a single destiny
We are all Tunisian in the face of repression
Governments and Arab governments
Are all- without exception
A gang of thieves.
And there is a question that rings obsessively in the minds of those who wonder
But shall never be answered by the official sources:
If we import all kinds of things from the West
Why can’t we import freedom and the rule of law?

The Fox Chase Review – 2008-2013 Archives now available

FCClockTallFlat Our archives for 2008 thru 2013 are now live and on line. You can find them here: http://www.thefoxchasereview.org/archives.html

Thanks to Sandra Davidson for taking care of this.

Love Highway by Stephanie Dickinson

lovehighwayPaperback: 230 pages

Publisher: Spuyten Duyvil Publishing (September 5, 2014)

Language: English

ISBN-10: 1941550169

ISBN-13: 978-1941550168

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Review by Lillian Ann Slugocki

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This is Feminist Noir

Love Highway by Stephanie Dickinson is a duet for two voices. It is a Rashomon-like narrative; two voices, two points of view, one story. A girl, Nylah, disappears after a night of clubbing in Manhattan. She is found in a trash heap, in New Jersey, strangled. A slight wisp of a girl, and a true story.  The first voice we hear is hers –the girl who is dead.  We walk with her on the last night of her life. The second voice we hear is Trinity, the girl who was there, who saw the whole story unfold, right before her eyes, and did nothing to stop it.

Dickinson has mastered the art of character; each voice is chillingly authentic. I recognized my 18 year old self, and the stupid choices I made. Hitchhiking on a highway at four in the morning comes to mind. A  miracle I made it home alive, and inevitable that Nylah does not. Interspersed in her narrative is a back story, a love story– one that reveals her naivete and her innocence, her privileged background which is a counterpoint or perhaps counter weight to the second voice– Trinity, a prostitute, paralyzed by love, bound to her pimp.

Dickinson is at her best when the story turns on the tiniest of details– how something smells, how something feels, what is sounds like, what it tastes like. I will forever see the overturned carton of Chinese noodles on the floor of the Weehawken Motel, and I will always know how hot it was the day the pimp and prostitute hauled her body to a dumpster in an abandoned lot. I will always know the color of the sky, and the weight of the gym bag that cradled her body, and the geography of the empty Manhattan apartment where Trinity hid out after the murder, the shower she took hoping to wash away the stain of her life.

Pacing and dramatic tension work best in the second half of the book. Without knowing this was based on a true story, I still understood Nylah wasn’t going to get out of this alive.  I knew that a girl walking alone on the West Side Highway, in a white mini-skirt, would come to no good. However, the fate of  Trinity was always in question. Her pimp could kill her, too.  Her foster parents could rescue her. Or, she could jump on a Greyhound bus and disappear. I wanted to see what happened to her. The epilogue is especially graceful  as Dickinson circles back to Nylah in the morgue; confused, but not especially afraid of the cold room and the smell of formaldehyde.

The book is dark, but this is redeemed by the humanity, and again, the authenticity of each voice. We might be frustrated and even angry by Nylah’s choice to strike off on her own at the impound lot, or Epiphany’s stubborn refusal to leave her boyfriend/pimp, but we do understand them. They are human, they are flawed, they are real to us, and Dickison renders each of them with language and imagery that is both lyrical and damned:

“When they reached Cooper Union the club girls were clustered in bunches. The fish girls in their slippery hair and mini skirts stood smoking cigarettes, their shoulders draped by fringed shawls. Like silken fins. Silken was the word for them.”

This was not an easy book to read, I had to put it down several times; especially when Nylah’s narrative takes us to the trash heap where her body comes to rest, or when Trinity smokes crack to ease the horror show of the hotel room, just as the sun is coming up. But Love Highway grabbed me, hooked me, and wouldn’t let go.  As a woman and as a writer, I recognize the need to tell these stories. I am happy that, in the hands of Stephanie Dickinson, they are authentic, even though as a reader, I am uneasy, discomfitted. This is not happily ever after. This is feminist noir, a real cold light shining on a real, cold story.

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You can find the book here:  http://www.spuytenduyvil.net/love-highway.html

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Lillian Ann SlugockiLillian Ann Slugocki  has been published by Seal Press, Cleis Press, Heinemann Press, Newtown Press, Spuyten Duyvil Press, as well as Bloom/The Millions, Salon, Beatrice, THE FEM Literary Magazine, HerKind/Vida, Deep Water Literary Journal, The Nervous Breakdown,  The Dr. T.J. Eckleburg Review, Blue Fifth Review, and Non Binary Review. Her novella How to Travel with Your Demons will be published by Spuyten Duyvil Press, 2015. She has an MA from NYU in literary theory, and has produced and written for Off-Broadway and National Public Radio. Follow her on twitter https://twitter.com/laslugocki

19th Annual Poetry Ink: 100 Poets Reading – April 26th

PoetryInk2015-front-coverSunday, April 26, 2015 12 noon

Brandywine Workshop, 728 S. Broad Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

For a listing of poets reading please visit:

http://www.moonstoneartscenter.org/poetryink/19th-annual-poetry-ink2015/

LitLife Poetry Festival – April 25th @ Rosemont College

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The LitLife Poetry Festival will be held on April 25th at Rosemont College. The college is located at 1400 Montgomery Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

For the complete schedule of events for the LitLife Poetry Festival visit: https://squareup.com/market/philadelphia-stories/litlife-poetry-festival